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Found 10 records similar to Litigation Year in Review 2016

Federal

The Directive on Civil Litigation Involving Indigenous Peoples will guide the Government of Canada’s legal approaches, positions and decisions taken in civil litigation involving Aboriginal and treaty rights, and the Crown’s obligation towards Indigenous peoples. The Directive is part of the Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada’s work to review the Government of Canada’s litigation strategy. This is to ensure the Government’s legal positions are consistent with its commitments, the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and Canadian values. Consistent with the Principles Respecting the Government of Canada’s Relationship with Indigenous Peoples, the Directive emphasizes the importance of resolving conflicts expeditiously and collaboratively, reducing the use of litigation and the courts.

Last Updated: May 3, 2019
Date Published: Jan. 11, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Litigation, Reconciliation, Aboriginal Peoples, Attorney General
Federal

The Litigation Year in Review for 2017 is the second time that the Attorney General of Canada published a report on the litigation decisions and strategies used on behalf of the Government of Canada. This year’s report highlights some of the litigation positions we took in the course of 2017 and focuses on four main themes: compensating for past wrongs, maintaining our commitment to human rights and the Charter, defending our national security, and intervening before the courts in the public interest. These themes are situated within a greater narrative around: 150th anniversary of Confederation, the 35th of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and the 35th anniversary of section 35 of the Constitution Act, 1982 and its recognition of the rights of Indigenous People’s. the litigation year in review also concerns itself with protecting national security, and making sure Canadians are aware that their rights are protected and not subject to the whims of the government that is in power.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 18, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Year in Review, Aboriginal Rights, Aboriginal law, Labour law, Legislation, Law, Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Reconciliation, Attorney General of Canada
Federal

In 2018, the Attorney General was responsible for representing the federal government in approximately 36,000 litigation matters. In the fulfillment of her mandate letter commitments, the Attorney General carried out her litigation responsibilities with a particular focus on the following:

  • Advancing reconciliation with Indigenous peoples
  • Defending federalism
  • Respecting the Charter of Rights and Freedoms
  • Protecting public safety and national security
  • Cracking down on tax avoidance
Last Updated: Apr. 8, 2021
Date Published: Feb. 5, 2019
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Year in Review, Aboriginal Rights, Aboriginal law, Legislation, Law, Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Reconciliation, Attorney General of Canada, National security
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Jun. 8, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 25, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  43rd Parliament: 2nd Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Mar. 31, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 24, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  44th Parliament: 1st Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Jun. 17, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 25, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  43rd Parliament: 2nd Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Jun. 8, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 26, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  43rd Parliament: 1st Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Jun. 8, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 7, 2020
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  43rd Parliament: 2nd Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Mar. 31, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 24, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  44th Parliament: 1st Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Jun. 8, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 26, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  43rd Parliament: 1st Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
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