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Found 10 records similar to Seabird Populations - Pacific Rim

Federal

This program assesses demographic parameters and breeding abundance of 5 species of ground (burrow) nesting seabirds: Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) and Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata) at the Seabird Rocks Colony through population counts and capture-mark-recapture techniques. Counts of individuals at the colony are done 3-4 times throughout a breeding season (May-July) to estimate the size of the breeding populations. A banding (capture-mark-recapture) program to estimate annual survivorship of the two storm-petrel species is done via mist-net arrays on two consecutive nights in early May and/or mid-to-late July. This project seeks to track the present status of the ground and burrrow-nesting seabirds on Seabird Rocks and any recovery that may occur due to future habitat restoration and/or predator-control measures.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Nesting seabirds, Breeding abundance, Annual survivorship, Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata)
Federal

This set of data contains the results of the various breeding seabird inventories conducted at Forillon National Park. Seabirds are recognized as good indicators of the quality of marine ecosystems and more particularly of the abundance of prey species on which they depend. Monitoring of seabird populations is therefore part of Forillon National Park's ecological integrity monitoring program. The abundance of different seabird species is determined by a total nest count in the cliffs during the nesting period.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  sea birds, inventory, Black-legged kittiwake, gull, Razorbill, Common murre, Black guillemot, Double-crested cormorant, nests
Federal

Gwaii Haanas has partnered with ECCC to monitor a set of permanent plots mapping colony structure and burrow occupancy rate by excavating samples of burrows of Ancient Murrelet and Cassin’s Auklet. The data are used to determine if the breeding population areas are changing at specific key nesting colonies and if the change signifies an increasing or decreasing population trend. An estimated 1.5 million seabirds breed colonially on the 200+ islands, islets and rocks of Haida Gwaii, including globally and nationally significant proportions of 5 seabird species. A significant threat to breeding seabirds is predation by non-native mammals, notably raccoons and rats.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ancient Murrelet, Cassin’s Auklet, plot system, burrow occupancy, breeding population, breeding seabirds, colony-nesting, British Columbia
Federal

The atlas provides maps and datasets representing seabirds at-sea densities in eastern Canada. Data were collected using ships of opportunity surveys and therefore spatial and seasonal coverage varies considerably. Densities are computed using distance sampling to adjust for variation in detection rates among observers and survey conditions. Depending on conditions, seabirds can be difficult to identify at the species level.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 31, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF XLS ESRI REST
Keywords:  Seabirds; Migratory birds; Oceans, Nature and Biodiversity, Species, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, National (CA), Scientific information
Federal

The Atlas of Pelagic Seabirds off the West Coast of Canada presents maps that display the distribution of 48 species of seabirds and two species pairs (i.e., Red-necked and Red Phalaropes, and Hawaiian and Galapagos Petrels). Seabird surveys were conducted aboard commercial and Canadian federal government ‘ships-of-opportunity’ from 1982-1983 and 1991-2005 within the study area (45° N to 58° N and from the coast to 148° W). Sightings of rare species that came from other sources (including some pre 1982 and post 2005) are also included in order to present as complete a picture as possible. For 33 species and one species pair, the average densities within 5’ latitude by 5’ longitude grid cells are displayed seasonally.

Last Updated: Jul. 28, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 1, 2009
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: TXT HTML
Keywords:  Pelagic Seabird Atlas, West Coast of Canada, Biota
Federal

Monitor variations in seabird numbers and colony size in the St. Lawrence system. Survey of over 20 species of seabirds and herons during the breeding season, in order to monitor population dynamics through time and space. Seabird populations are influenced by food abundance and quality. There is actually more than 1,000,000 birds from more than 20 different species that breed in nearly 1,000 active colonies.

Last Updated: May 29, 2017
Date Published: Apr. 19, 2012
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML CSV
Keywords:  Biological Classification, Animals/Vertebrates, Birds, Earth Science, Albatrosses/Petrels and Allies, Herons/Egrets and Allies, Waders/Gulls/Auks and Allies, Ducks/Geese/Swans
Federal

Non-native mammal species are monitored annually in areas critical for the protection important seabird islands. Remote cameras are deployed for 15-days to annually detect any changes to the mammal community at key sites. Non-native species pose the greatest ecological threat in Gwaii Haanas. Deer dramatically alter the vegetation and rats, racoons and squirrels impact native species both directly (predation) and indirectly (competition).

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Non-native mammals, remote camera, predation, mammal communities, ecological threat, British Columbia
Federal

The second largest concentration of common terns (Sterna hirundo) in North America is found on Tern Islands, a set of three small barrier islands separated by water at high tide located within Kouchibouguac National Park. These seabirds are indicators for the condition of coastal, marine, as well as estuarine ecosystems due to the use of these nesting and/or breeding grounds, and their reliance on the distribution of small fish populations in lagoons or along the outer beaches of barrier islands throughout the breeding season. The purpose of the common tern colony monitoring program is to determine the annual total number of nests and estimate mean clutch size in order to evaluate long-term breeding population health. The methods for this measure involve an annual systematic census on Tern Islands over a 1-2 day period in mid-to late June during the late incubation stage.

Last Updated: Aug. 18, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 8, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  common tern, Sterna hirundo, seabird, Tern Islands, barrier islands, breeding colonies, indicator species, coastal ecosystems, marine ecosystems
Federal

In partnership with ECCC, Gwaii Haanas monitors five Marbled Murrelet colonies by using a radar station located offshore. As birds fly out to the ocean at dawn, and return at dusk, the radar data is used to estimate the number of birds per hectare of suitable nesting habitat. Sampling areas focus on estuarine areas where the watershed or catchment contains old growth stands likely to host nesting birds in June and July. Marbled Murrelets are unique among seabirds because of their nesting habits – non-colonial nesting on thick, moss-covered limbs of large, old growth trees.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Marbled Murrelet, radar, British Columbia, threatened species, old growth forest
Federal

This program aims to capture population trends in several guilds of forest songbirds as well as trends in community species diversity. Sampling occurs early to late morning (sunrise-10am) between the first week of May and the first week of July. At each sampling station an 11 minute audio-recording and a concurrent audio-visual count are obtained. A total of 18 survey transects with 5 stations 300m apart are completed in the Long Beach Unit three times every four years since 2009 and an additional two transects have been completed in the West Coast Trail Unit annually since 2011.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Songbird Community, Abundance, Species richness, Biodiversity, Forest Stressors, Audio recording device
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