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Found 10 records similar to Erosion potential of dynamic ice breakup in Lower Athabasca River. Part I: Field measurements and initial quantification

Federal

The plate contains four maps showing the mean river freeze-over date, the mean lake freeze-over date, the mean river ice-free date and the mean lake ice free date. The four maps depict, in a general way, the average dates on which freshwater bodies in Canada become completely ice-covered in the fall, and become completely ice-free in the spring. The formation of an ice cover on a water body is called freeze-up; and the melting and dissipation of this ice cover is called break-up. Freeze-up begins when surface water is cooled to 0 degrees Celsius and ice crystals begin to form; it ends when the water body has attained its maximum ice coverage.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, hydrology, lakes, rivers, runoff, streamflow, water level
Federal

The timing of ice formation and breakup is an important factor affecting aquatic life and ecosystems. Continued monitoring is important due to potential changes the timing of ice formation and breakup, and therefore aquatic productivity. This study uses data from Water Survey of Canada guages and remote cameras to determine annual dates of ice breakup and freeze up at 1 lake and 3 river locations.

Last Updated: Dec. 5, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Lake Ice Phenology, Ice Formation & Breakup, Northwest Territories, Nahanni
Federal

River ice is a known occurrence in cold climate hydrological systems. The annual cycle of formation, growth, decay and clearance of river ice can include low flows and ice jams, as well as mid-winter and spring break-up events. Reports and associated data on river ice occurrence are often limited to site and season specific studies. Within Canada, the National Hydrometric Program (NHP) operates a network of gauging stations with water level as the primary measured variable.

Last Updated: Jun. 10, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 10, 2020
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ice, River Ice Hydrology, Observation/Measurement, Database, Canada
Federal

The Ice Thickness Program Collection contains ice thickness and snow depth measurements for 11 sites. Measurements are taken at approximately the same location every year on a weekly basis, starting after freeze-up when the ice is safe to walk on, and continuing until break-up or when the ice becomes unsafe. The location is selected close to shore, but over a depth of water which will exceed the maximum ice thickness.

Last Updated: Jul. 30, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 7, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF HTML XLS
Keywords:  ice thickness, Arctic, Canadian Ice Service, Ice, Arctic
Federal

In 2018, Fisheries and Oceans Canada initiated the Multidisciplinary Arctic Program (MAP) – Last Ice, the first ecosystem study of the poorly characterized region of the Lincoln Sea in the Marine Protected Area of Tuvaijuittuq, where multiyear ice still resides in the Arctic Ocean. MAP-Last Ice takes a coordinated approach to integrate the physical, biochemical, and ecological components of the sea ice-ocean connected ecosystem and its response to climate and ocean forcings. The cross-disciplinary program establishes baseline ecological knowledge for Tuvaijuittuq and, in particular, for its unique multiyear ice ecosystem. The database provides baseline data on the abundance of bacteria and viruses in multi- and first-year ice and in surface waters of the Lincoln Sea in Tuvaijuittuq, and their relation to bio-physical conditions.

Last Updated: Sep. 28, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 24, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Sea Ice, Arctic Ocean, Lincoln Sea, Marine biology, Bacteria, Arctic ecosystems, Viruses, Arctic
Federal

The Ice Thickness Program Collection contains ice thickness and snow depth measurements for 195 sites. Sites such as Eureka and Resolute have ice thickness records that go as far back as 1947. Record length varies from station to station with some of the Arctic stations exceeding 50 years of observations. Measurements are taken at approximately the same location every year on a weekly basis, starting after freeze-up when the ice is safe to walk on, and continuing until break-up or when the ice becomes unsafe.

Last Updated: Jul. 27, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 7, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  ice thickness, Arctic, ice, Canadian Ice Service
Federal

The Ice Thickness Program Collection contains ice thickness and snow depth measurements for 195 sites. Sites such as Eureka and Resolute have ice thickness records that go as far back as 1947. Record length varies from station to station with some of the Arctic stations exceeding 50 years of observations. Measurements are taken at approximately the same location every year on a weekly basis, starting after freeze-up when the ice is safe to walk on, and continuing until break-up or when the ice becomes unsafe.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 7, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  ice thickness, Arctic, ice, Canadian Ice Service
Federal

The map shows the location of glaciers and ice caps and also indicates the rivers and the lakes, which are fed by a glacier (or an ice cap) meltwater. The purpose of this plate is to identify those streams which are fed by glacier meltwaters. Because of the scale of the map, many minor glaciers have not been shown and, hence, streams fed by such glaciers are not depicted as being glacier fed. The proportion of glacier-derived to non-glacier-derived water decreases as one goes downstream from the glaciers.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  glaciers, hydrology, streamflow, water level
Federal

Since 2009, the Watershed Hydrology and Ecosystems Research Division of Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has coordinated spring time multi point ice thickness and composition surveys at up to 15 lake sites in the Northern Hemisphere. Data collected includes on ice snow depth, total ice thickness, depth of white ice, depth of black ice and hydrostatic water level. A review of open data, literature and data request sources identify additional ice thickness, composition and phenology datasets for the locations. This report summarizes the work undertaken to compile these Lake Ice (LI)- Thickness, Composition(TC) and Phenology(P) datasets for upload to a government of Canada open data portal.

Last Updated: May 13, 2022
Date Published: May 13, 2022
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Climate, Lakes, Climate change, Ice, ice thickness, water level, snow depth, phenology, ice depth
Federal

In 2018, Fisheries and Oceans Canada initiated the Multidisciplinary Arctic Program (MAP) – Last Ice, the first ecosystem study of the poorly characterized region of Tuvaijuittuq, where multiyear ice still resides in the Arctic Ocean. The program MAP-Last Ice takes a coordinated approach to integrate the physical, biochemical, and ecological components of the sea ice-ocean connected ecosystem and its response to climate and ocean forcings. This program provides baseline ecological knowledge for Tuvaijuittuq and, in particular, for its unique multiyear ice ecosystem. The database provides baseline data on fatty acid composition and stable isotopes signatures of sea ice communities in multi- and first-year ice in Tuvaijuittuq.

Last Updated: May 18, 2021
Date Published: Nov. 13, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Sea Ice, Arctic Ocean, Lincoln Sea, Marine biology, Arctic ecosystems
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