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Found 10 records similar to Wetland Pitcher Plants - Cape Breton Highlands

Federal

The park correlates pitcher plant morpology with availability of atmospheric nitrogen, as the latter may affect pitcher-plant development.

Last Updated: Jan. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  purple pitcher-plant, atmospheric nitrogen, nutrients, wetlands, Newfoundland
Federal

What? Water samples are being collected in various wetlands in Cape Breton Highlands National Park. When? The monitoring frequency for wetland water quality is annually with samples being collected in the spring of the year.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Wetland Health, Water Quality
Federal

What? Wetland ecosystem condition is being monitored in Cape Breton Highlands National Park through invertebrate (ants) population sampling. When? Monitoring frequency for this program is on a five year cycle, with site visits occurring in July and August.

Last Updated: Jul. 26, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Wetland Health, Species Richness, Invertebrate, Pitfall Traps, Bait Station, Ants (Formicidae)
Federal

Terra Nova National Park monitors wetland plant richness at 30 randomly selected plots along a 80 meter transect.

Last Updated: Jan. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  wetland vegetation, taxa richness, transect, biodiversity, Newfoundland
Federal

Historically, Pukaskwa had two naturally occurring populations of Pitcher’s Thistle; Creek Beach and Crescent beach, both located in Oiseau Bay. On Sept. 22 & 23, 1985 there was a severe windstorm that severely affected the beach at Oiseau Bay and caused erosion at the colony site and then on June 26, 1986, there was a severe thunderstorm with heavy rain that caused the washout of a huge portion of the Crescent Beach colony. Both of the colonies have shown negative population trends to the point where the Crescent Beach colony is now considered extirpated. From 1982 to 2014, each location was divided into plots and within each plot, each plant was tagged with a unique identifier using dymo tape and a bicycle spoke.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pitcher’s Thistle, Cirsium Pitcheri, Pukaskwa, restoration, species at risk
Federal

Park staff monitor invasive wetland plants at marsh monitoring sites in May-June each year (8 plots/year). In each wetland, pairs of 1 m x 1 m quadrats placed 2 m apart are sampled along 3 transects at 5 and 15 meters in wet meadow, emergent and submergent vegetation zones. The percent cover is recorded within each quadrat for 10 exotic invasive plant species including European Common Reed, European Frogbit and Purple Loosestrife.

Last Updated: Mar. 26, 2020
Date Published: Sep. 17, 2019
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Invasive Species, Phragmites australis, European Frogbit, Purple Loosestrife, Percent Cover, Exotic Plants, Thousand Islands, Ontario
Federal

What? An aerial wildlife population survey is used in Cape Breton Highlands National Park to estimate moose (Alces alces) population density. When? Monitoring frequency for this measure occurs every two to three years.

Last Updated: May 31, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Forest Health, Moose (Alces alces), Stratification, Population, Aerial
Federal

What? Stream temperatures on third order streams in Cape Breton Highlands National Park are being monitored to determine if mean water temperatures are changing over time. When? Monitoring frequency occurs annually from June 15th to September 15th on various park streams.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Aquatic Health, Freshwater, Temperature, Data Logger
Federal

What? Eastern Red-Backed Salamander (Plethodon cinereus) abundance is being monitored at various old growth forest sites within Cape Breton Highlands National Park. When? Monitoring frequency occurred annually for three consecutive years after initial set-up, and biennially henceforth.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Eastern-Red-Backed Salamander (Plethodon cinereus), Acadian Forest, Artifical Cover Objects, Indicator Species, Salamanader Abundance, Forest Health
Federal

What? Forest Health plots in the Boreal and Acadian land regions are being monitored in Cape Breton Highlands National Park to determine if any historical changes are occurring. When? Monitoring frequency for this program occurs on a five year cycle within the Acadian and Boreal Forest regions; sampling typically occurs in July or August.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Acadian Forest, Boreal Forest, Old Growth, Regeneration, Forest Health, Disturbance
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