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Found 10 records similar to Oil Sands bitumen sediment exposure of Fathead minnows

Federal

Oil Sands Sediment Exposures of Embryo-larval Fathead Minnows

Dataset contains laboratory-studied fathead minnow egg and larval survival rates when exposed to sediments collected from 18 sites in the Athabasca watershed (2010-2014). A controlled laboratory study examined the impacts on fathead minnow eggs and larval development when exposed to collected sediments at concentrations of 1, 5 and/or 25 g/L. Sediments and water were renewed daily, and eggs were assessed as they hatched (in about 5 days), and as the larval fish grew to 8-9 days post hatch (dph), and 15-16 dph. The data in the file present the mean survival (and standard deviation).

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Feb. 7, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  oil sands, monitoring, fish health, levels and trends, cumulative effects, environmental monitoring, Prairie and Northern Region - Alberta, observation / measurement, Prairie and Northern - Northwest Territories
Federal

To assess the toxicity of winter-time atmospheric deposition in the oil sands mining area of Northern Alberta, embryo-larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were exposed to snowmelt samples. Snow was collected in 2011–2014 near (< 7 km) oil sands open pit mining operations in the Athabasca River watershed and at sites far from (> 25 km) oil sands mining. Snow was shipped frozen back to the laboratory, melted, and amended with essential ions prior to testing. Fertilized fathead minnow eggs were exposed (< 24 h post-fertilization to 7–16 days post-hatch) to a range of 25%–100% snowmelt.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 28, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML JPG
Keywords:  Oil Sands, Snow Meltwater, Fathead minnow, Alberta Oil Sands, Water quality, Environment, Inland waters
Federal

This dataset contains the growth and survival data for Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to sediment from eleven sites within the St. Marys Area of Concern, as well as reference sediment (a mixture of sediment from two reference sites within Lake Erie, Long Point Marsh and Long Point Bay). The embryo-larval Fathead minnow exposure occurred over a three week period. Exposure was done from the egg stage (which lasted 5 days) to 9 and 16 days post hatch. Supplemental Information

Funding for this study was provided in part by the Government of Canada’s Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP) and in support of St. Marys Area of Concern.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: May 9, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  St. Marys River AOC, Burlington, Long Point Bay, Long Point Marsh, Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP), Area of Concern (AOC), Sediment exposure, Growth, Survival
Federal

Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) embryos and larvae are frequently used in toxicology, including short-term embryo-only tests which often use small volumes of test solution. The effect that such conditions may have on Fathead minnow development has yet to be explicitly described. Here we compared rates of embryonic development in Fathead minnow embryos reared under standard light and temperature conditions with a range of possible methods. All methods yielded excellent control survival.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Sep. 10, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  fish embryo toxicity tests, embryo, bioassay, tissue culture plate, embryo movement, methodology development, fish development, Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), Contaminants
Federal

This dataset contains the growth and survival data for Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposed to sediment from twelve sites within the Hamilton Harbour Area of Concern, as well as reference sediment (a mixture of sediment from two reference sites within Lake Erie, Long Point Marsh and Long Point Bay). The embryo-larval Fathead minnow exposure occurred over a three week period. Exposure was done from the egg stage (which lasted 5 days) to 9 and 16 days post hatch. Supplemental Information

Funding for this study was provided in part by the Government of Canada’s Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP) and in support of Hamilton Harbour Area of Concern.

Last Updated: Jul. 23, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 18, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Burlington, Hamilton Harbour, Long Point Bay, Long Point Marsh, Sediment exposure, Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas), Area of Concern (AOC), Great Lakes Action Plan (GLAP), Growth
Federal

Venlafaxine is an antidepressant and anti-anxiety drug that has been detected in municipal wastewater at low concentrations. To assess the potential of this compound to affect the survival, development and reproductive capacity of fish, we exposed Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) over a full lifecycle in a flow-through system to nominal venlafaxine concentrations. During the 167–168 day exposure, no significant changes were observed in survival, or the weights and lengths of Fathead minnows. At maturity, there were no significant differences relative to controls in condition factor, liver-somatic index, or secondary sex characteristics in the venlafaxine exposed male or female fish.

Last Updated: Jul. 23, 2021
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Venlafaxine, Pharmaceutical chemicals, Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), life cycle, antidepressant, Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), Contaminants, Biochemicals
Federal

Propranolol is a human pharmaceutical b-blocker that has been detected in municipal wastewater effluents in low concentrations. To assess the potential of this compound to affect fish, Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) were exposed for a life cycle in a flow-through system to nominal propranolol concentrations. During the 162-day to 165-day exposure, no significant changes in weights or lengths were seen in Fathead minnows, although the highest concentration of propranolol did cause a 15% decrease in survival of larval and juvenile stage fish compared with controls. At maturity, there were no significant changes in condition factor, liver-somatic index, or secondary sex characteristics in propranolol-exposed male or female fish.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: May 4, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Propranolol, Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas), Life cycle, Pharmaceutical chemicals, toxicity, Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), Contaminants, Biochemicals
Federal

The health of individual amphibians, amphibian populations, and their wetland habitats are monitored in the oil sands region and at reference locations. Contaminants assessments are done at all sites. Amphibians developing near oil sands activities may be exposed to concentrations of oil sands-related contaminants, through air emissions as well as water contamination. The focus of field investigations is to evaluate the health of wild amphibian populations at varying distances from oil sands operations.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 24, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  oil sands; monitoring; biodiversity; contaminants; amphibians, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants, Observation/Measurement, Assess Status of Species, Protect Species Well-Being, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Game (Wildlife)
Federal

Substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs) are used in the production of a variety of consumer products (lubricants, dyes, and polymers). Substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs) increase the life of consumer products by preventing the chain reaction of free radical production initiated by exposure to heat, oxygen, ozone, radiation and stress. It is important to consider that based on their physicochemical properties, substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs) are likely to partition into sediment when they enter an aquatic system. Thus the most likely environmentally relevant pathway for fish to become exposed to SPAs would be through contaminated sediment.

Last Updated: Jul. 23, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 1, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  substituted phenylamine antioxidants (SPAs), sediment, toxicity, Chemicals Management Plan (CMP), Contaminants, Fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas)
Federal

The objectives of the fish component of the integrated oil sands monitoring program are to provide the necessary data/information to address key questions related to both environmental health of fish populations and fish health issues that can be used to inform human use and consumption.

The questions underlying the fish monitoring design are related to the status and health of wild fish populations in the Lower Athabasca River including and in an expanded geographical extent. Data is being collected to provide a baseline against which future changes in fish populations will be evaluated, and compared to data from historical studies to assess change over time to the current state. Data is also being collected in areas of new oil sands development, to develop baseline data for future site-specific comparisons, contribute to an expanded geographic basis of the overall monitoring plan, and contribute to an improved ability to examine cumulative effects.

Last Updated: Jun. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 3, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Water - Quality, Observation/Measurement, Assess Toxicity; Manage and Monitor for Environmental Presence of Hazardous Substances and Waste, Monitor / Assess Substance and Waste Levels in Air; Water; Soil; Biota, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Water - Drainage regions - Peace–Athabasca, Oil sands, Fish
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