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Found 10 records similar to Communication, 1967 Western Canada

Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows make up of the communications network as of 1967 for Eastern Canada. Microwave routes above 750 megacycles per second are shown and are differentiated between message and television routes, message-only routes and television-only routes. As well, the tropospheric scatterwave receiving network is shown. Radio telephone links are denoted along with base stations and remote stations.

Last Updated: May 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 14, 1972
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  communications, communications equipment, radio, telecommunications, telecommunications networks, television
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows two condensed maps of television and radio stations across Canada. The top map shows the location and call letters of Canadian television stations and indicates the network connections for these stations. Television stations are shown as being operated by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation or by private affiliates. Private stations not in operation, satellite stations and satellite stations not in operation are also indicated.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  broadcasting industry, radio, television
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a set of two maps. The first map shows locations of radio broadcasting stations as of December 1967. Stations are shown on the map as being AM, FM or short-wave, and as English, French or bilingual. Locations with more than one station are marked with the number of stations.

Last Updated: May 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 14, 1972
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  broadcasting industry, radio, television
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a set of two maps. The first map shows exploration routes of British, French and Spanish explorers of eastern and central North America between 1524 and 1912. The second map shows exploration routes of British, Danish and French explorers of Hudson Bay and the western interior between 1610 and 1904.

Last Updated: May 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 11, 1971
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  colonization, historical research, history
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a set of three maps. The first map shows sea routes traveled by British, French, Russian and Spanish explorers between 1741 and 1794. The second map shows routes taken by explorers in search of the Northwest Passage during the 16th, 17th, 19th and 20th centuries (1576 to 1944). The third map shows routes taken between 1847 and 1879 by expeditions in search of Sir John Franklin, an explorer who perished in 1847 while in search of the Northwest Passage.

Last Updated: May 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 11, 1971
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  colonization, heritage, historical research, history
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a set of two maps. The first map shows exploration routes of the Arctic between 1587 and 1941 for American, British, Canadian, Danish, German and Norwegian explorers. A 1:7 500 000 scale supplementary map detailing the exploration of Nares Strait accompanies it. The second map shows routes of exploratory survey expeditions between the years 1758 and 1905.

Last Updated: May 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 11, 1973
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  colonization, heritage, historical research, history
Federal

Contained within the 2nd Edition (1915) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the telegraph network for Maritime Provinces and areas of Quebec. More then one line may have followed the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map, especially in larger cities. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country are likely to have more then one telegraph line serving the principal towns along each route indicated. Most telegraph lines run alongside railways.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1915
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  communications, communications equipment, communications industry, telecommunications, telecommunications networks
Federal

Contained within the 2nd Edition (1915) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the telegraph network for Ontario and southwestern Quebec. Two or more lines may follow the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country like Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec may have two or three telegraph lines serving the principal towns along each route indicated. Most telegraph lines follow alongside railway lines.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1915
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  communications, communications equipment, communications industry, telecommunications, telecommunications networks
Federal

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the network and destinations of telegraph lines in Quebec and Maritime Provinces. More then one line may have followed the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map, especially in larger cities. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country are likely to have more then one telegraph line serving the principal towns along each route indicated. Most telegraph lines are alongside railways.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Jun. 30, 1906
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  communications, communications equipment, communications industry, telecommunications, telecommunications networks
Federal

Contained within the 2nd Edition (1915) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the telegraph network for Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta. Two or more lines may follow the same route, but only one line is indicated on the map. Therefore, well-settled portions of the country may have two or three telegraph lines serving the principal towns along each route indicated. Most telegraph lines follow alongside railway lines.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1915
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  communications, communications equipment, communications industry, telecommunications, telecommunications networks
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