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Found 10 records similar to Sunshine and Temperature

Federal

Contained within the 2nd Edition (1915) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows 9 maps. Four maps show the average possible hours of sunshine for Canada in the summer months. There is a map for the entire summer and individual maps for each of the summer months (June, July, and August. The other five maps show the number of days during the year with temperatures above 32 degrees F (0 degrees C), 40 degrees F (4.4 degrees C), 50 degrees F (10 degrees C), 60 degrees F (15.6 degrees C) and 70 degrees F (21.1 degrees C).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1915
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, weather
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that consists of three maps based on the occurrence of a temperature of 32 degrees F (0 degrees C) or lower in a standard thermometer shelter at a level of four feet above the ground. Frost may occur at grass level when the temperature in the shelter remains above freezing. On the other hand, freezing temperatures in the thermometer shelter are a definite indication of frost at grass level. The maps, showing the mean dates of the first occurrence in the fall and the last occurrence in the spring of a temperature of 32 degrees F (0 degrees C), are representative of different localities in the country.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, weather
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows four maps of certain climatic aspects of the growing seasons. The first map shows the mean annual length of the growing season throughout Canada, assuming the growing season to be that part of the year when the mean daily temperature is above 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C). The map was constructed from data for the period 1921-1950 inclusive and is based on the mean annual number of days on which the mean temperature, as estimated from the smoothed annual course of temperature, was above 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C). The number of degree-days above 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C) is the difference between the daily mean temperature and 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C) when the former is more than 42 degrees F (5.6 degrees C).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  agriculture, climate, climate archives, meteorological data, precipitation
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows six maps of the Canadian ranges in temperature. The map entitled Mean Annual Maximum Temperature shows the mean of the highest temperature recorded each year from 1921 to 1950 inclusive. The Mean Annual Minimum Temperature map shows the mean of the lowest temperature recorded each year during the 30 year period. The two temperature extreme maps show the highest and lowest temperatures officially recorded during the same period.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, weather
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a set of three maps relating the effects and dependency of vegetation on environmental variables. One map shows the average annual potential evapotranspiration in inches from ground and plant surfaces for areas where there is a continuous vegetation cover and sufficient soil moisture for plant use. The second map shows the average annual water deficit in inches where, during parts of the growing season, soil moisture is insufficient to supply enough moisture for theoretically full plant growth. The last map shows the accumulated number of degree-days.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 11, 1969
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, weather
Federal

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows isothermal lines for each month of the year. Within the plate there are 12 maps, one for each month that varies from January to December. These lines are drawn at intervals of 5 degrees Fahrenheit connect the points having the same mean temperature. They are deduced from observations by the Meteorological Service extending over a series of years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 30, 1906
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, weather
Federal

Contained within the 1st Edition (1906) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows 11 maps. Two maps at the top of this plate presenting isothermal lines for summer and for the entire year. The isotherms for summer display the great northern "loop" of the summer isotherm of 55 degrees Fahrenheit, which make cultivation of cereals possible. The annual isothermal lines follow an easterly and Westerly direction which would obscure the beneficial effect indicated by the summer isotherms.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 30, 1906
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the annual sum of normal degree-days above 5 C (an indicator of total heat available for plants in the growing season). Data for period 1941 to 1970. Companion sheet to Frost-Free Period, Heating Degree-Days, Last Frost in Spring and First Frost in Autumn.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 12, 1981
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, meteorological data, meteorology, temperature
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate consisting of four maps, two showing wind and two showing sunshine. On the wind maps, the percentage frequency of the wind for winter and summer from each direction is represented by means of wind roses. Wind roses show wind direction and percentage frequency by means of lines proportional in length to the percentage frequency that extend out in the direction from which the wind blows. The percentage of calms is indicated by the figure in the centre of the station circle.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, weather, wind
Federal

The map shows the mean total precipitation in the month of July. Throughout much of the continental interior of Canada, precipitation reaches its annual maximum in the summer months and falls as rain. On the Prairies, the maximum monthly precipitation is usually in June or July, but this shifts to August at more northerly latitudes and in Ontario and Quebec. On both the west and east coasts, summer is the driest time of the year, particularly on Vancouver Island and the Sunshine Coast of southwestern British Columbia.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, precipitation
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