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Found 10 records similar to Quebec - Saint-Lawrence River - Shoreline Classification

Federal

This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place.

Last Updated: Nov. 15, 2019
Date Published: May 12, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, Ontario (ON), Water - Drainage regions - Great Lakes, Oceans
Federal

The Atlantic dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and estuarine shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place.

Last Updated: Jan. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 12, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, Atlantic - Prince Edward Island (PE), Atlantic - New Brunswick (NB), Atlantic - Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Atlantic - Nova Scotia (NS), Quebec (QC), Water - Drainage regions - Maritime Coastal
Federal

The North Coast of British Columbia dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline segmentation data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: May 12, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, British Columbia (BC), Water - Drainage regions - Pacific Coastal, Water - Ocean basin - Pacific Ocean, Oceans
Federal

This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database and it covers various locations across the Canadian Arctic i.e. James Bay, Resolute Bay and the south coast of Devon Island, the south-west coast of Hudson Bay, Labrador Coast, Victoria Strait, Beaufort Sea, and the North-east coast of Baffin Island. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone.

Last Updated: Jan. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 11, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, Territories - Northwest Territories (NT), Atlantic - Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Territories - Yukon (YT), Territories - Nunavut (NU), Water - Ocean basin - Hudson Bay, Water - Ocean basin - Arctic Ocean
Federal

With the changing climate conditions, marine traffic along Canada’s coastal regions has increased over the past couple of decades and the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil-spill-related emergencies is critical. Baseline coastal information, such as shoreline form, substrate, and vegetation type, is required for prioritizing operations, coordinating onsite spill response activities (i.e. Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique [SCAT]), and providing information for wildlife and ecosystem management. Between 2010 and 2017, georeferenced high-definition videography and photos were collected for various study sites across coastal Canada.

Last Updated: Dec. 9, 2020
Date Published: Aug. 15, 2020
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: TXT ZIP WMS HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Environmental emergencies, Environmental protection
Federal

This collection holds the layers used for the "Map of Upper Intertidal shoreline segmentation with Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) classification", a WMS service maintained by ECCC.

The segmentation covers shorelines for Northern Canada, the North coast of British Columbia, as well as Ontario, Quebec, and Atlantic regions.

Last Updated: Jan. 15, 2020
Date Published: May 12, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Shoreline Classification, Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, National (CA), Oceans
Federal

In the face of increasing economic opportunities in Canada's northern regions, the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil spill related emergencies in particular is critical. While significant efforts have been put towards documenting baseline coastal information across Canada’s southern regions, there is a large information gap regarding Arctic shorelines. Baseline coastal information such as shoreline form, substrate and vegetation type, is required for operational prioritization, coordination of on-site spill response activities (i.e., SCAT: Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique), as well as providing valuable information for wildlife and ecosystem management. A standardized methodology was developed to map shoreline characteristics at six study sites across the Canadian Arctic: James Bay, Resolute Bay, Hudson Bay, Labrador Coast, Victoria Strait, and Beaufort Sea.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 10, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: SHP PDF JSON CSV HTML
Keywords:  Canadian Arctic, shorelines, oil spill, emergency preparedness, sensitivity mapping, videography, Beaufort Sea, coastal management, coastal studies
Provincial
As part of measure 2.6 of the 2013-2020 Action Plan on Climate Change, MELCC funded two projects specific to the fluvial section of the St. Lawrence and aimed at supporting municipalities facing erosion and flooding hazards. The team from the Marine Geosciences Laboratory in the Department of Geography at Université Laval has set up a geospatial information base that is essential for assessing the risks associated with the erosion of the banks of the fluvial section of the St. Lawrence. The user will be able to find (i) the mapping of the classification of the shoreline (types of bank and their artificialization), (ii) the conditions of degradation of the artificial structures and (iii) the state of erosion of the natural or artificialized segments. The sectors most vulnerable to erosion have also been mapped and documented by image quality sheets. These fact sheets describe the characteristics of the shoreline and the main natural geomorphological processes (currents, ice, etc.) and humans (sea battling, water level management) associated with shoreline erosion for these sensitive areas, in order to better represent local dynamics. Geospatial data associated with shoreline mapping, quality sheets and the project report, which includes a description of the methodology and results, are available for download. The second project is led by Ouranos and aims to reduce the vulnerability to flooding and erosion associated with climate change for communities bordering the St. Lawrence fluvial section. The user will be able to consult two reports resulting from this project: a. Technical report on future trends in the main hydro-climatic factors that influence natural flood risks and shoreline erosion processes along the fluvial section of the St. Lawrence. The objectives of this report are to provide a portrait of these hazards, covering both the recent past and future projections (2050 and 2080). These factors range from large-scale phenomena, such as the spring flood of the St. Lawrence River or marine enhancement, to local phenomena such as freeze-thaw processes that affect cliffs and clay microcliffs. b) Summary of the needs mentioned by the actors of the regional round tables (RCTs) to adapt the riparian communities at risk of bank erosion and flooding. This report presents the profile of the participants of the four workshops organized in the fall of 2018, the approach used for the consultation and a summary of the needs expressed. The lists of participants and the detailed reports of each workshop are also annexed to this document. The TCRs consulted during these workshops are those of Haut-Saint-Laurent — Greater Montreal, Lake Saint-Pierre, the fluvial estuary and the TCR of Quebec.**This third party metadata element was translated using an automated translation tool (Amazon Translate).**
Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: May 29, 2020
Organization: Government and Municipalities of Québec
Formats: PDF FGDB/GDB HTML JPG KMZ
Keywords:  Mapping, Climate change, Shoreline classification, Waterfront community, St. Lawrence River, Geomorphological process, Government information
Federal

Shorelines for the Pasqua, Crooked, Echo, and Round Lakes within the Qu'Appelle Valley River system in Saskatchewan

Last Updated: Jul. 27, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 15, 2013
Organization: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Formats: WMS PDF FGDB/GDB ESRI REST GML
Keywords:  Topography, Hydrography, Watersheds, Aerial photography
Federal

Black Oystercatcher breeding success is estimated by visually surveying known breeding habitat in key areas of Gwaii Haanas. Surveys are conducted twice a year during breeding season. Black Oysercatchers are very vulnerable to disturbances, predation of eggs and young, predators, oil spills and reduction of food sources due to global warming. They are also considered to be a keystone species in the north Pacific, and an indicator of the health of the rocky shoreline and intertidal community.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Black Oystercatcher, breeding, breeding success, keystone species, British Columbia, rocky shoreline, intertidal community
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