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Found 10 records similar to Stream Benthic Invertebrates Stress - Thousand Islands

Federal

Benthic invertebrate data is collected and used for two biological measures that assess TINP’s freshwater quality. Data collection from streams in the park occurs yearly in July, and follows the Ontario Benthos Biomonitoring Network protocol. Field procedures involve a kick and sweep method at two riffles and one pool location.

Last Updated: Mar. 28, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Benthic Invertebrates, Streams, Freshwater, OBBN, Thousand Islands, Ontario
Federal

TINP evaluates seedling and sapling density within 5 subplots of the 20m x 20m EMAN forest plots in August each year. Plots are rotated every 5 years (6 plots/year) and are monitored according to term Ecological Monitoring and Assessment Network (EMAN) Protocols and Standards.

Last Updated: Mar. 28, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  EMAN, Regeneration, Seedlings, Saplings, Forests, Thousand Islands, Ontario
Federal

Stream benthic invertebrates are important indicators of aquatic health and have been monitored in PEI National Park to assess community diversity as well as abundance of pollution tolerant and intolerant taxa in streams. Benthic invertebrates are collected on an annual basis using the sampling methods developed by Environment Canada for the "CABIN" stream monitoring network. Samples are sorted and invertebrates are classified to the lowest possible taxomonic classification to determine abundance and biodiversity in these aquatic ecosystems. Community biodiversity is assessed using the Simpson’s reciprocal index (D).

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, invertebrates, benthic, CABIN, diversity, abundance, pollution, stream
Federal

Benthic samples are collected from 6 streams (Oiseau Creek, White Gravel River, North Swallow River, Swallow River, Tagouche Creek and Imogene Creek) in mid to late September using standarized methods for collecting invertebrates developed by the Canadian Biomonitoring Network (CABIN). Five sub-measures are calculated for the status of this measure; family richness, percent oligochaeta, the Hilsenhoff family biotic index (HfBI), Ephemeroptera - Plecoptera - Tricoptera (EPT) index and a multivariate community metric (90th percentile Hellinger's Distance).

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Benthic, Pukaskwa, CABIN, richness, Hilsenhoff, EPT index, Hellinger’s Distance, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera
Federal

The EPT index measures the proportion of freshwater organisms belonging to the taxa Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera (or EPT for short). These species are considered to be highly sensitive to pollution and are a measure of good environmental conditions. Any significant declines to these species in a stream could indicate that a pollutant has entered the ecosystem. Streams are sampled in permanent locations on a 3-year rotational panel monitoring design.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Trichoptera, aquatic systems, %EPT, freshwater system, British Columbia
Federal

The richness of benthic macro-invertebrate species is used to monitor the overall health of stream ecosystems in Gwaii Haanas. Any shifts in community composition, initially detected as an increase or decrease in species richness, can be the result of nutrient levels, atmospheric pollutants, or a physical disturbance of the habitat. This is the result of species adapted to the new conditions increasing in abundance and species maladapted to the new conditions decreasing in abundance. Streams are sampled in permanent locations on a 3-year rotational panel monitoring design.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Aquatic ecosystem health, Invertebrate richness, aquatic systems, Benthic Invertebrate, freshwater system, British Columbia
Federal

Thousand Islands NP installs temperature data loggers to monitor hourly stream water temperatures at designated stream study sites from spring until fall.

Last Updated: Feb. 5, 2020
Date Published: Feb. 4, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Hyperabundant Species, Herbivore, Deer, Browse, Thousand Islands, Ontario
Federal

Tributary Biomonitoring (Lower Athabasca River)

Benthic macroinvertebrates, comprising insects, crusteaceans, molluscs and worms, represent a group of organisms used widely in environmental monitoring programs as early warning indicators to assess the effects of change in water quality or physical habitat conditions on aquatic ecosystem health. An interpretive report (Culp et. al., 2018) was released in 2018 which included assessments of the benthic and supporting data from 2012-2015. An excerpt from the executive summary regarding the tributary benthic invertebrate results is provided below and the full report can be found online at https://open.alberta.ca/publications/9781460140314.

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2021
Date Published: Jul. 10, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV
Keywords:  biomonitoring, oil sands, benthic invertebrates, organisms, macroinvertebrate, water quality, rivers, streams, wetlands
Federal

In order to assess long-term changes in streams Thousand Islands NP monitors their water quality yearly in July. Samples are analyzed for multiple parameters including: total phosphorus, ammonium, nitrate, turbidity, and specific conductivity.

Last Updated: Mar. 28, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Streams, Water Quality, Freshwater, Turbidity, Phosphorus, Nitrogen, Specific Conductivity, Thousand Islands, Ontario
Federal

Mainstem Athabasca River Biomonitoring

Benthic macroinvertebrates, comprising insects, crusteaceans, molluscs and worms, represent a group of organisms used widely in environmental monitoring programs as early warning indicators to assess the effects of change in water quality or physical habitat conditions on aquatic ecosystem health. An interpretive report (Culp et. al., 2018) was released in 2018 which included assessments of the benthic and supporting data from 2012-2015. An excerpt from the executive summary regarding the mainstem benthic invertebrate results is provided below and the full report can be found online at https://open.alberta.ca/publications/9781460140314).

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2020
Date Published: Jul. 10, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV XLS
Keywords:  biomonitoring, oil sands, benthic invertebrates, organisms, macroinvertebrate, water quality, rivers, streams, wetlands
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