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Found 10 records similar to Anthropogenic disturbances across the Canadian boreal ecosystem collected from 2008 to 2010 Landsat imagery Gridded to a 1km resolution .

Federal

The generation of geospatial thematic information for managing and monitoring Canada's boreal ecosystem is essential for researchers, land managers, and policy makers. Canada's boreal region is a vast mosaic of forests, wetlands, rivers and lakes, but anthropogenic disturbances have impacted these ecosystems resulting in habitat loss, fragmentation and threats to biodiversity. Across Canada various geospatial datasets representing anthropogenic disturbance exist for timber harvesting, hydro-electric activity, settlement and oil & gas activities; however, these products often vary in scale, attributes, time period, and mapping technique. Driven by the need for national data as part of the 2011 boreal caribou science assessment, a standardized methodology was developed and implemented to create a single geospatial dataset representing anthropogenic disturbances across a significant portion of Canada's boreal ecosystem.

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2022
Date Published: May 18, 2012
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  anthropogenic disturbance, boreal, forest, habitat, landcover, landuse
Federal

As part of a scientific assessment of critical habitat for boreal woodland caribou Environment Canada 2011, see full reference in accompanying documentation , Environment Canada's Landscape Science and Technology Division was tasked with providing detailed anthropogenic disturbance mapping across known caribou ranges. This data allowed researchers to better understand the attributes that have a known effect on caribou population persistence. The mapping process was established to create a nationally consistent, reliable and repeatable geospatial dataset that followed a common methodology. The methods developed were focused on mapping disturbances at a specific point of time, and were not designed to identify the age of disturbances, which can be of particular interest for disturbances that can be considered non-permanent, for example cutblocks.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2013
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  anthropogeneic disturbance, boreal, forest, caribou, habitat, mapping, landcover, landuse
Federal

As part of a scientific assessment of critical habitat for boreal woodland caribou (Environment Canada 2011, see full reference in accompanying documentation), Environment Canada's Landscape Science and Technology Division was tasked with providing detailed anthropogenic disturbance mapping, across known caribou ranges, as of 2015. This data comprises a 5-year update to the mapping of 2008-2010 disturbances, and allows researchers to better understand the attributes that have a known effect on caribou population persistence. The original disturbance mapping was based on 30-metre resolution Landsat-5 imagery from 2008 -2010. The mapping process used in 2010 was repeated using 2015 Landsat imagery to create a nationally consistent, reliable and repeatable geospatial dataset that followed a common methodology.

Last Updated: Jul. 29, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 15, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: XML WMS DOC HTML PDF TXT ESRI REST
Keywords:  anthropogenic disturbance; boreal; forest; caribou; habitat; mapping; landcover; landuse, Nature and Biodiversity, National (CA), Protect Species Well-Being, Develop Species Recovery / Management / Conservation Plans, Science and Technology Branch, Wildlife and Landscape Science, Unclassified, Ecosystems
Provincial

This is a linear disturbance dataset for the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills region of Alberta. This dataset was created to support spatial analyses of linear disturbances in the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills region for the Alberta Environment and Parks report entitled 'Linear Disturbances in the Livingstone-Porcupine Hills of Alberta: Review of Potential Ecological Responses' which can be found at https://open.alberta.ca/publications/9781460140338. All linear disturbances are grouped into five categories using attribution from input data sources. These include: paved roads.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML ZIP
Keywords:  -ACCESS, -LINEAR-DISTURBANCE, -LIVINGSTONE-PUBLIC-LAND-USE-ZONE, -PORCUPINE-HILLS-PUBLIC-LAND-USE-ZONE, -ROADS, -TRAILS, DOWNLOADABLE-DATA, ENVIRONMENT, LIVINGSTONE-PORCUPINE-HILLS-REGION
Federal

At the establishment of Kouchibouguac National Park in 1969, remnants of past human history and intervention activities such as agriculture and wood harvesting since the mid-1880s have significantly influenced the Park’s current landscape. To this day, human-caused disturbance continues through visitor use, construction of trails, campgrounds and facilities, as well as maintenance work such as the mowing of roadsides. As expected, this long history of anthropogenic disturbances has greatly increased the prevalence of exotic vegetation species on the landscape. The invasion of natural ecosystems by these invasive plants is considered one of the biggest threats to the biodiversity and ecological integrity of these systems.

Last Updated: Jul. 3, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  exotic, invasive, alien, plant species, vascular flora, vegetation, Invasive Plant Index, IPI, landscape
Federal

Environment and Climate Change Canada’s cause-effect monitoring is focused on understanding how boreal songbirds, including several Species at Risk, are affected by human activity in the oil sands area, particularly the impact of the physical disturbance of forested habitats from exploration, development and construction of oil sands. Determining the abundance of songbird species associated with various habitat type(s) and understanding how the type and number of birds varies with type and amount of habitat, are important components of assessing the effect of habitat disturbance. Regional-scale monitoring focuses on understanding how and why boreal songbirds, including several Species at Risk, are affected by human activity across the Peace, Athabasca and Cold Lake oil sands area. Local-scale projects focus on addressing gaps in our understanding of complex response patterns at regional scales by targeting specific habitats or development features of interest.

Last Updated: Jun. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Canada Warbler; species at risk; landbirds; birds; mixedwood; forest; vegetation; point count; avian; spot mapping, Nature and Biodiversity - Habitat, Observation/Measurement, Protect Species Well-Being, Expand Scientific Knowledge/Develop New Methodologies for Managing; Protecting and Restoring Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Migratory birds, Oil sands
Federal

What? Forest Health plots in the Boreal and Acadian land regions are being monitored in Cape Breton Highlands National Park to determine if any historical changes are occurring. When? Monitoring frequency for this program occurs on a five year cycle within the Acadian and Boreal Forest regions; sampling typically occurs in July or August.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Cape Breton Highlands, Acadian Forest, Boreal Forest, Old Growth, Regeneration, Forest Health, Disturbance
Provincial

The Natural Disturbance Type map is based on the Provincial Biodiversity Guidebook (1995) and the current and most detailed version of the approved corporate provincial Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification (BEC) Zone/Subzone/Variant/Phase map (version 11, August 10th, 2018) (Data Catalog record: https://catalogue.data.gov.bc.ca/dataset/f358a53b-ffde-4830-a325-a5a03ff672c3). The natural disturbance type classification code is used to designate a period process or event such as insect outbreaks, fire, disease, flooding, windstorms and avalanches that cause ecosystem change and renewal. Natural disturbance type classification and mapping is used for a wide variety of applications in British Columbia. A few examples include: delineation of Natural Disturbance Types for Landscape Unit Planning; delineation of Seed Planning Zones; as an input for Predictive Ecosystem Mapping; reporting on the ecological representation of the Protected Areas Strategy; and as a level in the classification hierarchy for Broad Ecosystem Units.

Last Updated: May 18, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 7, 2020
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML WMS HTML
Keywords:  BEC, BGC, Canada, NDT, Natural Disturbance Type, biogeoclimatic ecosystem classification, climate, ecological land classification, vegetation
Provincial

This is a linear disturbance dataset for the Upper North Saskatchewan and Upper Red Deer River Basins of Alberta. This dataset was created to support spatial analyses of linear disturbances in the Upper North Saskatchewan and Upper Red Deer River Basins for the Alberta Environment and Parks report entitled “Ecological response to land use and human activities in the eastern slopes of Alberta's Rocky Mountains: A scientific assessment”. This is a polyline dataset covering the Upper North Saskatchewan and Upper Red Deer River Basins of Alberta, Canada. It shows linear features present in ~2016/2017.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 13, 2016
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML GDB HTML
Keywords:  -ACCESS, -ALBERTA, -ANTHROPOGENIC, -HUMAN-FOOTPRINT, -LINEAR-DISTURBANCE, -LINEAR-FOOTPRINT, -ROADS, -ROCKY-MOUNTAINS, -TRAILS
Federal

Local-scale projects focus on gaps in our understanding of complex response patterns at regional scales by targeting specific habitats or development features of interest. Environment and Climate Change Canada is monitoring how and why boreal birds respond to oil sands development features using 25-hectare survey sites selected to represent a range of disturbance intensities from low to high. Sites are visited multiple times during the breeding season, from early May through early July, to count the number of individual birds within the study site. The monitoring design targets habitat and disturbance types that have limited information.

Last Updated: Jul. 25, 2019
Date Published: Dec. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Oil sands, Migratory birds, Canada Warbler, species at risk, landbirds, birds, mixedwood, forest, vegetation
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