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Found 10 records similar to Aboriginal Peoples circa 1823

Federal

This map shows the distribution of Aboriginal peoples early in the eighteenth century after a hundred years of Aboriginal-European contact at the time of the French Regime. Ethnohistorical societies are identified on the map by the major linguistic family to which they belong. Ethnohistorical societies are Aboriginal peoples that were known by name and location to Europeans early in the eighteenth century. A linguistic family code identifies each ethnohistorical society on the map and is used to reference specific information for each ethnohistorical society (refer to the Atlas of Canada's 5th Edition map Native Peoples 1740 for the information).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  aboriginal peoples, canadian history, history, map
Federal

The map shows the distribution of Aboriginal peoples early in the seventeenth century before the eastern population dislocations. Ethnohistorical societies are identified on the map by the major linguistic family to which they belong. Ethnohistorical societies are Aboriginal peoples that were known by name and location to Europeans early in the seventeenth century. Also mapped are the major archaeological sites current to 1980.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  aboriginal peoples, canadian history, history, map
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the distribution of indigenous population of Canada and the northern United States circa 1740. It also shows population groups by size, name and linguistic family and outlines areas of European settlement and areas known to Europeans. There is an extensive table keyed to map which lists indigenous societies.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 1988
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  aboriginal peoples, indians, inuit, language groups, languages, linguistic diversity, mother tongue
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a map that shows distribution of indigenous population of Canada and the northeastern United States circa 1630. It also shows population groups by size, name and linguistic affiliation, and depicts archaeological complexes, and outlines areas known to Europeans. Extensive table detailing subsistence patterns of indigenous societies. European settlements by 1630 are also listed.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 1988
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  aboriginal peoples, indians, languages, linguistic diversity, mother tongue
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a map that shows distribution of the indigenous population of Canada and the northern United States circa 1823. Population groups shown by size, name and linguistic affiliation. Map also outlines areas known to early nineteenth century census takers. Extensive table referenced to map gives additional data on aggregation and mobility.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 16, 1990
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  aboriginal peoples, indians, inuit, language groups, linguistic diversity, mother tongue
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is plate with a series of maps. The first map that shows distribution of Indian and Inuit communities; most give status (for example, Indian Reserve), area, name, and linguistic family (eleven major families representing 51 languages). Inset for southwestern British Columbia. Summary charts of Indians by status, and of Indians and Inuit by linguistic family; 1976 data.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 12, 1980
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  aboriginal peoples, indians, inuit, language groups, languages
Federal

Communities in east Hudson Bay and James Bay are concerned about ecosystem changes observed in recent decades, particularly related to sea-ice conditions, and also about potential impacts of contaminants from long-range atmospheric transport and regional human activities. The Arctic Eider Society’s Community-Driven Research Network (CDRN) was established to measure and better understand large-scale cumulative environmental impacts in east Hudson Bay and James Bay. Building on CDRN collaborations and activities in five communities (Sanikiluaq, Kuujjuaraapik, Inukjuak, Umiujaq, Chisasibi), this Northern Contaminants Program (NCP) community-based project generated new information on metal bioaccumulation that provide a regionally integrated perspective on metal exposure in the marine environment of east Hudson Bay and James Bay.

Last Updated: Sep. 1, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 20, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Metals, Environment, Hudson Bay, metals, food web, community-based monitoring
Federal

Contained within the 2nd Edition (1915) of the Atlas of Canad, is a map that shows the distribution of 11 aboriginal groups of Canada, Alaska and Greenland, circa 1915. The areas shown in different colours represent land occupied by the native linguistic families. There are a greater number of linguistic families on the Pacific coast of British Columbia than in all the rest of Canada. Major railway systems are shown.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1915
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  aboriginal peoples, indians, innu, inuit
Federal

Depicted on this map is British North America less than one hundred years after the fall of New France. It also shows the emergence of British influence prior to Confederation. British North America circa 1823 was comprised of Lower Canada, Upper Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Newfoundland (including the Labrador Coast). The Northwest Territories were considered British possessions, while the Hudson’s Bay Company controlled Rupert’s Land.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, history, map
Federal

The current 50 languages of Canada's indigenous peoples belong to 11 major language families - ten First Nations and Inuktitut. Canada's Aboriginal languages are many and diverse, and their importance to indigenous people immense. This map shows the major aboriginal language families by community in Canada for the year 1996.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  aboriginal languages, demographic maps, map
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