Open Government Portal

Found 10 records similar to Initial Penetration of the St. Lawrence Valley 1534 to 1583

Federal

The fourth phase of exploration in what is now Canada consisted of Frobisher's three voyages (1576, 1577 and 1578) and the two voyages of Davis (1586 and 1587) made in search of a northwest passage to Asia. These voyages represented the initial penetration of the Arctic. The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of maritime exploration between 1497 and 1599. The historical names found on the map are derived from contemporaneous maps and written documents of the period.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

Champlain's resource surveys of the Atlantic Coast and Saint Lawrence River between 1603 and1607 were the first exploration in this area since Cartier and Bellenger. This map shows five of Champlain's exploration routes. The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of the penetration of the Eastern Great Lakes and Hudson Bay from 1600 to 1650. The historical names found on the map are derived from contemporaneous maps and written documents of the period.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

In the early seventeenth century, there were two voyages that explored the Labrador coastline and southern Baffin Island. These voyages were by Waymouth (1602) and Knight (1606). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of the penetration of the Eastern Great Lakes and Hudson Bay from 1600 to 1650. The historical names found on the map are derived from contemporaneous maps and written documents of the period.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

This map shows the first phase of exploration of what is now Canada, which was largely confined to the east coast of the island of Newfoundland and to southeastern Labrador. Shown here are the routes of three explorers: Cabot (1497), Corte-Real (1500 to 1501) and Fernandes (1500). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of maritime exploration between 1497 and 1599. The historical names found on the map are derived from contemporaneous maps and written documents of the period.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

The second phase of exploration of what is now Canada lasted from 1519 to 1533. During that period, explorers charted the Atlantic Coast in search of a western passage to Asia. This map shows the routes of four explorers: Fagundes (1519 to 1526), Verrazzano (1524), Gomes (1525) and Rut (1527). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of maritime exploration between 1497 and 1599.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

In the period from 1610 to 1632, English navigators explored Hudson Strait and Hudson Bay. This map shows the routes of seven explorers: Hudson (1610 to 1611), Button (1612 to 1613), Bylot (1615 to 1616), Baffin (1615 to 1616), Munk (1619 to 1620), Fox (1631), and James (1631 to 1632). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of the penetration of the Eastern Great Lakes and Hudson Bay from 1600 to 1650. The historical names found on the map are derived from contemporaneous maps and written documents of the period.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

Between 1609 and 1628, European explorers charted more unknown waters along the Atlantic Coast, and also penetrated down the St. Lawrence River into the eastern Great Lakes. The routes of four explorers are shown on this map: Hudson (1609), Champlain (1609, 1613 and 1615 to 1616), Brûlé (1615 to 1618 and 1621 to 1623) and La Roche (1626). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of the penetration of the Eastern Great Lakes and Hudson Bay from 1600 to 1650. The historical names found on the map are derived from contemporaneous maps and written documents of the period.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

In the period from 1634 to 1650, exploration in what is now Canada was largely carried out by Jesuit missionaries. Their findings consolidated European knowledge of the eastern Great Lakes. The map shows the routes of seven expeditions: Nicollet (1634), Bogaert (1634 to 1635), Brébeuf and Chaumonot (1640 to 1641), Jogues and Raymbaut (1641), Jogues and Couture (1642), Druillettes (1646) and De Quen (1647). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans in the period 1497 to 1650; and the navigation of all exploration routes during the period of the penetration of the Eastern Great Lakes and Hudson Bay from 1600 to 1650.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

Exploration in the period 1731 to 1757 was dominated by the rapid thrust of French exploration into the western interior of Canada, particularly by Pierre Gaultier de la Vérendrye and his five sons who made nine expeditions between 1731 to 1743. As well, the map shows the exploration routes of other explorers sponsored either by New France or by England: Mallet (1739), De Niverville (1751), Henday (1754 to 1755) and Smith and Waggoner (1756 to 1757). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans and the navigation of all exploration routes in the period 1651 to 1760. The historical names found on the map are derived from contemporaneous maps and written documents of the period.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Federal

Exploration in the period 1671 to 1686 was dominated by the return of the intendant, Jean Talon, to New France. In order to keep out the English and promote the fur trade to Montréal, he encouraged a series of expeditions, including exploration of the rivers flowing into James Bay. This map shows five explorer routes: Albanel and Denys (1671 to 1672), Louis Joilliet (1679), Dulhut (1683 to 1684), Peré (1684) and De Troyes (1686). The map also shows the extent of territory known to Europeans and the navigation of all exploration routes in the period 1651 to 1760.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  canadian history, explorations, history, map
Date modified: