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Found 10 records similar to Amphibian occupancy - Elk Island

Federal

Amphibians are vulnerable to an array of
environmental changes because of their
permeable skin, a complex life history, and a dependence on moist terrestrial or wetland habitats. These attributes make them excellent indicators of the health of aquatic ecosystems. Amphibians can indicate problems of air and water pollution, drought, habitat loss and
fragmentation, the introduction of non-native species such as sport fish and bullfrogs, and the emergence and spread of infectious disease. Amphibian occupancy is determined using auditory and visual encounters surveys.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Amphibian occupancy, boreal chorus frog, western toad, long-toed salamander, columbia spotted frog, Alberta
Federal

This measure tracks changes in presence and absence of three amphibian species at 43 potential breeding sites. Each site is visited twice (where possible), to estimate and account for detection probability the Western Toad (Bufo boreas), Columbia Spotted Frog (Rana luteiventris), and Long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum). Mount Revelstoke National Park will monitor these amphibian species using this protocol once every 3 years.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  amphibians, breeding sites, wetlands, Western toad, Bufo boreas, Columbia spotted frog, Rana luteiventris, long-toed salamander, Ambystoma macrodactylum
Federal

This measure tracks changes in presence and absence of three amphibian species at 12 potential breeding sites. Each site is visited twice (where possible), to estimate and account for detection probability the Western Toad (Bufo boreas), Columbia Spotted Frog (Rana luteiventris), and Long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum). Mount Revelstoke National Park will monitor these amphibian species using this protocol once every 3 years.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  amphibians, breeding sites, wetlands, Western toad, Bufo boreas, Columbia spotted frog, Rana luteiventris, long-toed salamander, Ambystoma macrodactylum
Federal

We surveyed the presence of four native amphibian species in wetlands throughout the eastern section of Banff National Park. This dataset represents detection or non-detection for each of the four species. We performed auditory and visual surveys of 60 pre-determined breeding sites . We surveyed each site two times during a sampling period between mid-April and the end of May.

Last Updated: May 4, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  amphibian occupancy, long-toed salamander, Ambystoma macrodactylum, boreal/western toad, Anaxyrus boreas, Columbia spotted frog, Rana luteiventris, wood frog, Rana sylvatica
Federal

Amphibians around the world are in decline and this has led to many international initiatives to monitor and catalog amphibian biodiversity.
The western toad (Bufo boreas) found in Jasper National Park is a species of special concern protected under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). Jasper National Park conducts auditory and visual amphibian surveys to estimate species occurrence. Occupancy modelling of amphibians in the Park, using presence/absence data, provides a useful and flexible framework for population trend analyses and helps inform management.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, amphibians, frog, toad, salamander, western toad, Bufo boreas
Federal

Kootenay National Park samples 28 randomly selected potential amphibian breeding sites (out of possible 66) to determine presence or absence of amphibian species. Each of the 28 sites is visited 3 times every 2 years and all detected species are recorded.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Amphibians, occupancy, breeding sites, abundance, population change, British Columbia
Federal

Yoho National Park samples 28 randomly selected potential amphibian breeding sites (out of possible 66) to determine presence or absence of amphibian species. Each of the 28 sites is visited 3 times every 2 years and all detected species are recorded.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Amphibians, occupancy, breeding sites, abundance, population change, British Columbia
Federal

This program captures counts of amphibian egg masses used to measure abundance and distribution trends in the breeding populations of Red-legged Frogs (Rana aurora) and Northwestern Salamanders (Ambystoma gracile) in the Long Beach Unit of the park. It is assumed that one egg-mass represents one breeding female. The Red-legged Frog is listed as a species of Special Concern (COSEWIC 2004). Surveys represent a complete visual census of selected representative lakes and wetlands (representing different wetland types, sizes and at variable distances from roads) and occur annually in the spring.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Red-legged Frog (Rana aurora), Northwestern Salamander (Ambystoma gracile), Wetland ecosystem
Federal

Amphibians worldwide are facing declines and possible extinction. Wood frogs (Lithobates sylvaticus) are the only amphibian in Kluane National Park and Reserve. They are considered an important component of wetlands and are highly valued by Southern Tutchone peoples. Threats to wood frogs in Kluane are primarily the loss of habitat due to climate change and infection by diseases such as chytrid fungus.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Kluane, Yukon, wood frog, Lithobates sylvaticus, climate change, wetland, amphibian
Federal

Elk Island National Park conducts an ungulate aerial surveys of the entire park, to census the elk and moose populations. The surveys are carried out in the late fall or winter annually. Park staff also conducts opportunistic counts of elk and moose over the summer and obtain demographic information during elk handling. Elk and moose population is in the same database as bison populations.

Last Updated: May 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ungulate population, wapiti, elk, moose, ungulate, aerial census, opportunistic counts, ungulate demographics, Alberta
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