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Found 10 records similar to Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document – Zinc

Federal

Nitrate and nitrite are widespread in the environment. They are naturally produced by the oxidation of nitrogen by microorganisms and, to a lesser extent, by lightning. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for nitrate in drinking water is 45 mg/L. This is equivalent to 10 mg/L measured as nitrate-nitrogen.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, nitrate, nitrate in drinking-water, nitrite, nitrite in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Mercury is a toxic element and serves no beneficial physiological function in man; a maximum acceptable concentration of 0.001 mg/L (1 µg/L) in drinking water has therefore been established.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 29, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, mercury, mercury in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Boron is an essential element for plant growth and is applied directly to the soil as a plant fertilizer. Sodium borate and boric acid are used as fungistatic agents on vegetables, fruits and trees. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for boron in drinking water is 5 mg/L (5000 µg/L).

Last Updated: Dec. 1, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, Boron, water containing Boron, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Although hardness may have significant aesthetic effects, a maximum acceptable level has not been established because public acceptance of hardness may vary considerably according to the local conditions. Water supplies with a hardness greater than 200 mg/L are considered poor but have been tolerated by consumers; those in excess of 500 mg/L are unacceptable for most domestic purposes.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, hardness, hardness in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The guideline technical document for trihalomethanes (THMs) also includes a specific guideline for bromodichloromethane (BDCM). The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for trihalomethanes (THMs) in drinking water is 0.100 mg/L (100 µg/L) based on a locational running annual average of a minimum of quarterly samples taken at the point in the distribution system with the highest potential THM levels. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for bromodichloromethane (BDCM) in drinking water is 0.016 mg/L (16 µg/L) monitored at the point in the distribution system with the highest potential THM levels.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, trihalomethanes, trihalomethanes in drinking-water, bromodichloromethane, bromodichloromethane in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chlorite in drinking water is 1 mg/L. The MAC for chlorate in drinking water is 1 mg/L. A guideline for chlorine dioxide is not required because of its rapid reduction to chlorite in drinking water. Utilities should make every effort to meet the guidelines, however, any method of control employed must not compromise the effectiveness of water disinfection.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 22, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chlorite, chlorite in drinking-water, chlorate, chlorate in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Because cyanide is toxic to humans, a maximum acceptable concentration of 0.2 mg/L (200 µg/L) for free cyanide in drinking water has been set.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, cyanide, cyanide in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Dicamba is a broad-spectrum chlorobenzoic acid herbicide used in large quantities for general weed control on grain crops, pastures and non-crop areas. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for dicamba in drinking water is 0.12 mg/L (120 µg/L).

Last Updated: Dec. 1, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, Dicamba, water containing Dicamba, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Naturally occurring barium can be found in most types of rocks and can enter surface and groundwater by leaching and eroding from sedimentary rocks. A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for total barium in drinking water is 2.0 mg/L (2,000 µg/L).

Last Updated: Dec. 1, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, Barium, water containing Barium, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Atrazine is used extensively in Canada as a pre- and post-emergence weed control agent, primarily for corn but also for rapeseed, and for total vegetation control in non-cropland and industrial areas. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for atrazine in drinking water is 0.005 mg/L (5 µg/L).

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, Atrazine, water containing Atrazine, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
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