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Found 10 records similar to Elk - Waterton Lakes - Grasslands

Federal

Elk Island National Park conducts an ungulate aerial surveys of the entire park, to census the elk and moose populations. The surveys are carried out in the late fall or winter annually. Park staff also conducts opportunistic counts of elk and moose over the summer and obtain demographic information during elk handling. Elk and moose population is in the same database as bison populations.

Last Updated: May 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ungulate population, wapiti, elk, moose, ungulate, aerial census, opportunistic counts, ungulate demographics, Alberta
Federal

Elk Island National Park annually conducts an aerial census of bison populations of the entire park, as well as opportunistically surveying herd composition. Bison population data is in the same database as elk and moose populations.

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Bison populations, wood bison, plains bison, species at risk, aerial census, opportunistic counts, herd composition, Alberta
Federal

Waterton Lakes National Park (WLNP) protects one of the last tracts of native fescue prairie habitat in the Parks Canada system. Native Fescue grasslands are an important element of biodiversity in the park, as well as an endangered ecosystem in Canada. It is not just aspen encroachment that is a concern, but also the increasing density of existing aspen stands. Aspen sprouts (aspen < 2.5m height) and shrubs adjacent to grasslands will be removed through prescribed burning of grassland areas, with the goal of increasing the area of fescue grasslands in the project area's prescribed burn units by 2019 through removal of 5% of 2014 shrub and aspen sprout cover.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  fecue grasslands, woody encroachment, stand density, aspen sprout cover, shrub cover, prescribed burning, GIS, Alberta
Federal

Elk (Cervus canadensis) are generally considered a keystone species across a variety of landscapes. Elk (C. canandenis nelsoni) in Jasper National Park is one of four extant subspecies of elk occurring in North America. They are an important wildlife component in the Park regarding the management of human-wildlife conflict and understanding caribou/wolf population dynamics. Every five years, data are collected by aerial surveys over set transects across the Park to estimate population size and composition and inform management activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Elk, Cervus canadensis nelsoni, aerial survey, population
Federal

In Waterton Lakes National Park, grizzly bears are used as an umbrella species representing wildlife that are sensitive to human disturbance, whereas the status of secure habitat is used as a surrogate measure for assessing cumulative effects. The status of grizzly bear habitat is therefore considered to be a landscape level indicator of the ecological integrity in Waterton Lakes National Park and the significantly larger regional ecosystem upon which this wide ranging species depends. The Sensitive Species Secure Habitat measureassesses the percent of available grizzly bear habitat in Waterton Lakes National Park; this assessment is based on digital elevation models, remote sensing data, and human activity trail counters.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  sensitive species, grizzly bear, umbrella species, GIS, satellite imagery, digital elevation models, telemetry, remote camera, trail counter
Federal

This program, led by Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC), is part of a larger national program serving to describe spatial and temporal patterns in water quality on many major rivers in Canada. In Waterton, physical and chemical variables are measured at water quality sites located on the two major rivers that originate in or flow through the park, the Waterton River and the Belly River. These sites are in the headwaters of major rivers that provide ecosystem services for many downstream users (e.g. drinking water) and are upstream of major point- and non-point source pollution.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  water quality index, water samples, water chemistry parameters, surface water chemistry, Alberta
Federal

Elk Island National Park monitors primary productivity to determine the health of grassland vegetation throughout the park. This measure relies on remotely-sensed multispectral satellite imagery, specifically, the Landsat Shortwave Infrared (SWIR2) and Near Infrared (NIR) bands. Analysis is performed roughly every five years, using images from mid-July. Grassland and Forest primary productivity is in the same database.

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Grassland, primary productivity, percent change, remote sensing, multispectral satellite imagery, landsat, capstone project, vegetative growth, Alberta
Federal

Motion-detection cameras are a cost-effective and non-invasive tool used in Waterton Lakes National Park for sampling mammal populations and estimating species occurrence. Occupancy modelling, which uses detection/non-detection data from cameras, provides a useful and flexible framework for population trend analyses. Data are collected throughout the year across Waterton Lakes National Park to determine change in the distribution of key animal populations as well as supporting demographic predictions to better inform management.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  multi-species mammal occupancy, native species, cougar, lynx, grizzly bears, red fox, wolf, wolves, wolverine
Federal

Elk Island National Park uses the Area Burned Condition Class (ABCC) method to evaluate the ecological impact of fire on the landscape and the success of utilizing fire to maintain a mosaic of vegetative composition and structure for healthier populations of native species. Area burned is derived from Landsat imagery, and is updated as needed. This measure uses the same database as grassland area burned.

Last Updated: Aug. 7, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Forest, remote sensing
Federal

Elk abundance and population composition are assessed annually during an aerial survey conducted between mid-January and mid-February. The elk population composition is measured annually in a classified aerial count held in late Fall.

Last Updated: Dec. 12, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Elk, Abundance, population Composition, Wapiti, Aerial Survey, Manitoba
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