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Found 10 records similar to Breeding seabirds - Gwaii Haanas

Federal

This program assesses demographic parameters and breeding abundance of 5 species of ground (burrow) nesting seabirds: Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) and Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata) at the Seabird Rocks Colony through population counts and capture-mark-recapture techniques. Counts of individuals at the colony are done 3-4 times throughout a breeding season (May-July) to estimate the size of the breeding populations. A banding (capture-mark-recapture) program to estimate annual survivorship of the two storm-petrel species is done via mist-net arrays on two consecutive nights in early May and/or mid-to-late July. This project seeks to track the present status of the ground and burrrow-nesting seabirds on Seabird Rocks and any recovery that may occur due to future habitat restoration and/or predator-control measures.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Nesting seabirds, Breeding abundance, Annual survivorship, Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata)
Federal

Non-native mammal species are monitored annually in areas critical for the protection important seabird islands. Remote cameras are deployed for 15-days to annually detect any changes to the mammal community at key sites. Non-native species pose the greatest ecological threat in Gwaii Haanas. Deer dramatically alter the vegetation and rats, racoons and squirrels impact native species both directly (predation) and indirectly (competition).

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Non-native mammals, remote camera, predation, mammal communities, ecological threat, British Columbia
Federal

These fish-eating colonial waterbirds breed and nest in colonies on islands in and around Fathom Five National Marine Park. Five species of colonial waterbird are monitored. These birds and their eggs are effective measures of environmental contamination and aquatic ecosystem health.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Colonial Waterbirds, environmental contamination, breeding, nesting, islands, aquatic ecosystem health, eggs, Herring Gull, Ring-billed Gull
Federal

In partnership with ECCC, Gwaii Haanas monitors five Marbled Murrelet colonies by using a radar station located offshore. As birds fly out to the ocean at dawn, and return at dusk, the radar data is used to estimate the number of birds per hectare of suitable nesting habitat. Sampling areas focus on estuarine areas where the watershed or catchment contains old growth stands likely to host nesting birds in June and July. Marbled Murrelets are unique among seabirds because of their nesting habits – non-colonial nesting on thick, moss-covered limbs of large, old growth trees.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Marbled Murrelet, radar, British Columbia, threatened species, old growth forest
Federal

The second largest concentration of common terns (Sterna hirundo) in North America is found on Tern Islands, a set of three small barrier islands separated by water at high tide located within Kouchibouguac National Park. These seabirds are indicators for the condition of coastal, marine, as well as estuarine ecosystems due to the use of these nesting and/or breeding grounds, and their reliance on the distribution of small fish populations in lagoons or along the outer beaches of barrier islands throughout the breeding season. The purpose of the common tern colony monitoring program is to determine the annual total number of nests and estimate mean clutch size in order to evaluate long-term breeding population health. The methods for this measure involve an annual systematic census on Tern Islands over a 1-2 day period in mid-to late June during the late incubation stage.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 8, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  common tern, Sterna hirundo, seabird, Tern Islands, barrier islands, breeding colonies, indicator species, coastal ecosystems, marine ecosystems
Federal

Monitor variations in seabird numbers and colony size in the St. Lawrence system. Survey of over 20 species of seabirds and herons during the breeding season, in order to monitor population dynamics through time and space. Seabird populations are influenced by food abundance and quality. There is actually more than 1,000,000 birds from more than 20 different species that breed in nearly 1,000 active colonies.

Last Updated: May 29, 2017
Date Published: Apr. 19, 2012
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML CSV
Keywords:  Biological Classification, Animals/Vertebrates, Birds, Earth Science, Albatrosses/Petrels and Allies, Herons/Egrets and Allies, Waders/Gulls/Auks and Allies, Ducks/Geese/Swans
Federal

Black Oystercatcher breeding success is estimated by visually surveying known breeding habitat in key areas of Gwaii Haanas. Surveys are conducted twice a year during breeding season. Black Oysercatchers are very vulnerable to disturbances, predation of eggs and young, predators, oil spills and reduction of food sources due to global warming. They are also considered to be a keystone species in the north Pacific, and an indicator of the health of the rocky shoreline and intertidal community.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Black Oystercatcher, breeding, breeding success, keystone species, British Columbia, rocky shoreline, intertidal community
Federal

This set of data contains the results of the various breeding seabird inventories conducted at Forillon National Park. Seabirds are recognized as good indicators of the quality of marine ecosystems and more particularly of the abundance of prey species on which they depend. Monitoring of seabird populations is therefore part of Forillon National Park's ecological integrity monitoring program. The abundance of different seabird species is determined by a total nest count in the cliffs during the nesting period.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  sea birds, inventory, Black-legged kittiwake, gull, Razorbill, Common murre, Black guillemot, Double-crested cormorant, nests
Federal

Data Sources: Banque informatisée des oiseaux de mer au Québec (BIOMQ: ECCC-CWS Quebec Region) Atlantic Colonial Waterbird Database (ACWD: ECCC-CWS Atlantic Region).. Both the BIOMQ and ACWD contain records of individual colony counts, by species, for known colonies located in Eastern Canada. Although some colonies are censused annually, most are visited much less frequently. Methods used to derive colony population estimates vary markedly among colonies and among species.

Last Updated: Jun. 15, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 14, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: SHP WMS JSON HTML CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Eastern Canada; Atlantic Ocean, Bird Colonies; Seabirds, Nature and Biodiversity, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Environmental Stewardship Branch, Canadian Wildlife Service, Unclassified, Birds
Federal

Counts of nesting pelicans and cormorants at the Lavallee Lake colony are conducted each spring via aerial photography, and mortality is counted each fall by walking transects through the colony. Pelicans and cormorants feed on small and large freshwater fish up to 100 km from the colony and are an indicator of the health of the aquatic/terrestrial interface in the ecosystem.

Last Updated: Mar. 25, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 23, 2020
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Prince Albert National Park, Saskatchewan, freshwater, American White Pelican, Double Crested Cormorant, breeding, mortality, disease
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