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Found 10 records similar to Tributary Water Quality - Oil Sands Region

Provincial

Preliminary geological map (1:50 000 scale) of Little Salmon Range, central Yukon (parts of NTS 105 L/1, 2 and 7) including geological cross-sections, mineral occurrences, fossil localities and geochronology.

Last Updated: Nov. 2, 2021
Date Published: May 12, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: other HTML
Keywords:  Yukon Geological Survey
Federal

Mercury is a toxic element and serves no beneficial physiological function in man; a maximum acceptable concentration of 0.001 mg/L (1 µg/L) in drinking water has therefore been established.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 29, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, mercury, mercury in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The Turkey Lakes Watershed (TLW) is 1 of 5 hydrologically "calibrated" basins in eastern Canada that were originally devoted to process-oriented research into "acid rain" effects. They were selected to cover a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions, deposition magnitudes, and terrain characteristics. Batchawana Lake is the headwater (highest elevation) lake in the TLW. It has two distinct basins, north and south (L1 and L2).

Last Updated: Jul. 30, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 30, 2018
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV HTML
Keywords:  acid rain, watershed basin, hydrology, lakes, major ions, nutrients, metals, temperature, dissolved oxygen
Federal

Nitrate and nitrite are widespread in the environment. They are naturally produced by the oxidation of nitrogen by microorganisms and, to a lesser extent, by lightning. The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for nitrate in drinking water is 45 mg/L. This is equivalent to 10 mg/L measured as nitrate-nitrogen.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, nitrate, nitrate in drinking-water, nitrite, nitrite in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chlorite in drinking water is 1 mg/L. The MAC for chlorate in drinking water is 1 mg/L. A guideline for chlorine dioxide is not required because of its rapid reduction to chlorite in drinking water. Utilities should make every effort to meet the guidelines, however, any method of control employed must not compromise the effectiveness of water disinfection.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 22, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chlorite, chlorite in drinking-water, chlorate, chlorate in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The Catalogue of IM/IT Services is a trusted record of the IM/IT Service Offerings rendered to National Defence and Canadian Armed Forces users on the designated network (DWAN) by service provider organizations across the Defence Information Program.

Based on the Profile of the Government of Canada's Information Technology (IT) Services and Information Management (IM) Services, the Catalogue is all-encompassing, containing service offerings which are available by request an end-user and those which are only used by technical support staff (not requestable by end-users). It reflects extensive research and an ongoing engagement with Environmental Chiefs of Staff (ECS)/Level 1 (L1) stakeholders.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 11, 2022
Organization: National Defence
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  IM/IT Service, catalogue, end-user service, technical service, enterprise service agreement
Federal

Tributary Biomonitoring (Lower Athabasca River)

Benthic macroinvertebrates, comprising insects, crusteaceans, molluscs and worms, represent a group of organisms used widely in environmental monitoring programs as early warning indicators to assess the effects of change in water quality or physical habitat conditions on aquatic ecosystem health. An interpretive report (Culp et. al., 2018) was released in 2018 which included assessments of the benthic and supporting data from 2012-2015. An excerpt from the executive summary regarding the tributary benthic invertebrate results is provided below and the full report can be found online at https://open.alberta.ca/publications/9781460140314.

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2021
Date Published: Jul. 10, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV
Keywords:  biomonitoring, oil sands, benthic invertebrates, organisms, macroinvertebrate, water quality, rivers, streams, wetlands
Federal

Expanded Geographic Area (M9, M10, M11a, M12, BI1, RI1, SL1, SL2, QU1 [2013] and M9, M10, M11a, M12, BI1, BU1, BU2, RI1, SL1, SL2, QU1, MC2 [2011-March 2018])

Water quality chemistry data for 17 sites in the lower Athabasca River (LAR), the Peace and Slave rivers, and their tributaries, including measurements of major ions, nutrients, metals (dissolved and total) and organics (including BTEX, cyanide and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). An interpretive report (Glozier et. al., 2018) was released in 2018, which included assessments of the water quality status and trends for data from 2012-2015. An excerpt from the executive summary is provided below and the full report can be found on line here (http://environmentalmonitoring.alberta.ca/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/OS-TS-Water-1.4-Surface-Water-Quality-Mainstem-Tribs-Delta-1.pdf) ;

“During the three year JOSM period, over 1300 water quality samples were collected from 21 locations representing a nearly 5-fold increase in overall sampling effort in the Lower Atahbasc river (LAR), Peace River (PR), Slave River (SR) and Peace Athabasca Delta (PAD).

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2020
Date Published: Feb. 7, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF CSV HTML
Keywords:  water quality, long term monitoring, oil sands, Athabasca River, metals, major ions, nutrients, organics, physical and chemical
Federal

Because cyanide is toxic to humans, a maximum acceptable concentration of 0.2 mg/L (200 µg/L) for free cyanide in drinking water has been set.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, cyanide, cyanide in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Provincial

This lithium ground- and formation-water geochemical dataset will enable present and future companies to better evaluate their targets and characterize their resource estimates by being able to distinguish between background and anomalous concentrations of lithium throughout Alberta. The dataset comprises lithium geochemical data from ground and formation water in Alberta and near the Alberta border. The data were captured from several databases, including those from Alberta Geological Survey (oil and gas wells database, AERI and Beaver River Basin projects), and the Alberta Research Council. In total there are 1,511 records, of which 48 records have >75 mg/L Li.

Last Updated: Apr. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 20, 2010
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML XLS
Keywords:  72e, 72l, 72m, 73d, 73e, 73l, 73m, 74d, 74e
Date modified: