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Found 10 records similar to Snow Depth

Federal

This map shows the average maximum snow depth in centimetres computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). Over southern Canada this usually occurs in January or February, while the time of maximum accumulation occurs much later in mountain areas and in the Arctic. The main features of the map are the pronounced maximum in snow accumulation over the western Cordillera, where snow depths can exceed several metres, with a secondary maximum over Quebec and Labrador. These maxima are related to their proximity to oceans, which act as sources of moisture and winter storms, and to the orographic effect of the mountains in the case of western Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, snow
Federal

The map shows the mean maximum depth of snow in centimetres, the standard deviation of the mean maximum depth of snow, and the mean date of mean maximum depth of snow. The information shown on the map is compiled from 1961 – 1970 snow course data in conjunction with 1955 – 1972 snow depth data. An appreciation of the quantity of snow in storage within a drainage basin during late winter is critical to spring flood forecasting. As well, decisions regarding overland transport and wildlife control can be rationally taken.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, hydrology, precipitation, water balance
Federal

This map shows the median date of snow-cover loss (defined as the last date with 14 consecutive days of snow cover greater than 2 centimetres in depth) computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). In areas with permanent or semipermanent snow cover (for example, Arctic ice caps) or in areas with irregular or ephemeral snow cover (coastal British Columbia), researchers were unable to compute the median values. The end date contours follow topography more closely than start date due to the influence of elevation on total snow accumulation and air temperature. The date of snow-cover loss has important implications for wildlife (for example, bird migration and nesting), vegetation, local climate and hydrology.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, snow
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a plate with seven maps. The first map shows mean annual snowfall in Canada. Four additional maps show median snow depth for four separate months. The final two maps show snow cover and maximum snow depth.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 1991
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows the snow cover data, referring primarily to the presence and total depth of a snow cover on the surface of the earth, across Canada. This is in contrast to data characteristics of snow cover depth, which increases by the occurrence of freshly fallen snow, but decreases by melting, wind action and settling. Two maps of these maps show the mean dates of the occurrence of first and last snow covers by one inch (2.54 cm) or greater. These are not necessarily the average dates to the beginning and ending of a continuous snow cover, since the snow cover may form and later disappear once or several times during a winter season.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, snow, weather
Federal

This map shows the median date of snow-cover onset (defined as the first date with 14 consecutive days of snow cover greater than 2 centimetres in depth) computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). In areas with permanent or semipermanent snow cover (for example, Arctic ice caps) or in areas with irregular or ephemeral snow cover (coastal British Columbia), researchers were unable to compute the median values. The main feature of the map is the rapid southward extension of snow cover over Canada during the September to December period. The moderating influence of Hudson Bay can be seen over northern Quebec, where snow cover starts later than in the equivalent latitudes west of Hudson Bay.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, snow
Federal

This dataset corresponds to daily snow cover percentage at 1km resolution grid over land areas of Canada from 2006-2010. The data are subsampled by 4km to reduce data volumes and considering the geolocation uncertainty of the input satellite imagery. The daily maps are generated by assimilation of daily cloud screened NOAA AVHRR satellite imagery and Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC) snow depth analysis snow depth and density fields within an off-line version of the CMC daily snow depth model. The snow depth model is modified to include snowpack reflectance model and a surface radiative transfer scheme that relates vegetation and snowpack reflectance to top-of-canopy bi-directional reflectance.

Last Updated: Mar. 2, 2022
Date Published: May 19, 2015
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  snow cover, snow areal extent, Canada, Alberta, British Columbia, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador, Northwest Territories
Federal

The Ice Thickness Program Collection contains ice thickness and snow depth measurements for 11 sites. Measurements are taken at approximately the same location every year on a weekly basis, starting after freeze-up when the ice is safe to walk on, and continuing until break-up or when the ice becomes unsafe. The location is selected close to shore, but over a depth of water which will exceed the maximum ice thickness.

Last Updated: Jul. 30, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 7, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: PDF HTML XLS
Keywords:  ice thickness, Arctic, Canadian Ice Service, Ice, Arctic
Federal

The map shows the annual snowfall (in centimetres) based on the 30-year period 1941-1970. Snowfall is measured by inserting a ruler into the new snow at several points to obtain its depth and to estimate the degree of drifting or scouring that has occurred. The water equivalent of snowfall for most climatologically stations is estimated by simply assuming the freshly fallen snow has a density of 0.10 gram per cubic centimetre. On the average, this is a sound approximation over large parts of the country, but variations from 0.05 to 0.15 are common from storm to storm, and in the drier regions the average density is probably closer to 0.08 gram per cubic centimetre.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, hydrology, precipitation, water balance
Federal

This measure is based on snow-tracking data from established snow-transects. Trends for this metric focus on wary carnivores (cougar, lynx, wolf, and wolverine) on transects within 5 km of the Townsite. Data collected include location, species presence, number of animals, hours since snow, & snow-depth.

Last Updated: May 31, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 10, 2021
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  wildlife, snow tracking, wolf, cougar, lynx, wolverine, Kootenay National Park
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