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Found 10 records similar to Growth Rate of Leisure Services Employment, 1986 to 1996

Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. The growth rates in commercial services between 1986 and 1996 indicate that growth was widely dispersed across Canada. Generally, commercial service activities were disproportionately attracted to the larger centres (Toronto, Montréal); however, growth was less in these larger cities. High growth rates occurred throughout Alberta and British Columbia, and around Toronto and Montréal where the urban markets have grown most rapidly.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

High-Growth Firm – Based on list of all businesses in Canada included in Statistics Canada’s Business Register, a “high-growth firm” is an enterprise with average annualized growth greater than 20% per annum over a three-year period. That is, the total growth over a three-year period must be greater than 72.8%. For this indicator, growth has been measured by revenue (though it can also be measured by growth in employment). High-growth enterprises are required to have at least 10 employees at the start of the three-year period, and are also required to be at least four years old.

Last Updated: Apr. 21, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 31, 2018
Organization: Western Economic Diversification Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Firms, companies, businesses, growth
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth rates for personal services show much the same regional pattern, the relatively slow growth in the eastern Prairie provinces contrasting with the rapid growth in British Columbia, Alberta and southern Ontario and Quebec. The very highest rates of growth occurred in coastal British Columbia and around Toronto, Ottawa, and Montréal, where population growth was rapid.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. The growth rates for wholesaling varied regionally, with the higher rates in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec contrasting with those in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and the Atlantic provinces. The highest rates of growth occurred in British Columbia and Alberta, and in or near Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal. These are some of the places with the highest per capita incomes, and generally the places with highest rates of population growth during this period.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

High-growth enterprises based on number of employees and revenue, by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).

Last Updated: Oct. 28, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 7, 2015
Organization: Statistics Canada
Formats: XML CSV HTML
Keywords:  business dynamics, business performance and ownership, entry exit mergers and growth, table
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth in financial services varied from decline or slow growth in the Prairie provinces to rapid growth in British Columbia and southern Ontario and Quebec. The highest rates of growth occurred in coastal British Columbia and in the urban centres near the largest cities (for example, Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth in retailing varied regionally, with declines in Manitoba and Saskatchewan contrasting with rapid growth in the rest of the country. The highest growth rates are found in the urban centres near the largest cities: Varennes, Quebec; Airdrie, Alberta; and Buckingham, Quebec (near Ottawa).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth in business services was relatively slow in the Prairie provinces and rapid in British Columbia and southern Ontario and Quebec. The highest rates of growth occurred in coastal British Columbia and in the urban centres near the largest cities (Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

This map shows how commercial activity is distributed within urban areas and the impact of commercial services on the urban landscape, by mapping what proportion of stores (hence jobs) in an urban area that are found in dispersed stores. The dispersed stores are those activities that are left out when all the commercial polygons in the city have been mapped. They include the traditional activities such as service stations and convenience stores, as well as clusters of stores that are too small to qualify as commercial polygons. In most cities, some 30% of stores are assigned to this category, with higher proportions in small cities and slow-growth cities.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

The maps of growth rates for the period 1986 to 1996 tell us how many jobs each city has added relative to its size, so that cities can be compared. Those cities that have special advantages for service activity will be the places that grow in the future. The difference in the employment totals (1996 value minus 1986 value) is called the absolute growth; and the absolute growth divided by the 1986 value is called the growth rate (absolute growth / 1986 value). Almost all places with a growth rate of more than 40% in total service employment over the decade are located in Alberta, British Columbia or within 200 kilometres of Toronto or Montréal.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
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