Open Government Portal

Found 10 records similar to Growth Rate of Personal Services Employment, 1986 to 1996

Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth in financial services varied from decline or slow growth in the Prairie provinces to rapid growth in British Columbia and southern Ontario and Quebec. The highest rates of growth occurred in coastal British Columbia and in the urban centres near the largest cities (for example, Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth in business services was relatively slow in the Prairie provinces and rapid in British Columbia and southern Ontario and Quebec. The highest rates of growth occurred in coastal British Columbia and in the urban centres near the largest cities (Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth rates for leisure services were relatively slow in the eastern Prairie provinces and rapid in British Columbia and southern Ontario and Quebec. The very highest rates of growth were widely dispersed in the urban centres on the edge of metropolitan regions. These high-growth places are often those that cater to the recreational needs of nearby large cities.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. The growth rates for wholesaling varied regionally, with the higher rates in British Columbia, Alberta, Ontario and Quebec contrasting with those in Saskatchewan, Manitoba and the Atlantic provinces. The highest rates of growth occurred in British Columbia and Alberta, and in or near Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal. These are some of the places with the highest per capita incomes, and generally the places with highest rates of population growth during this period.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. The growth rates in commercial services between 1986 and 1996 indicate that growth was widely dispersed across Canada. Generally, commercial service activities were disproportionately attracted to the larger centres (Toronto, Montréal); however, growth was less in these larger cities. High growth rates occurred throughout Alberta and British Columbia, and around Toronto and Montréal where the urban markets have grown most rapidly.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth in retailing varied regionally, with declines in Manitoba and Saskatchewan contrasting with rapid growth in the rest of the country. The highest growth rates are found in the urban centres near the largest cities: Varennes, Quebec; Airdrie, Alberta; and Buckingham, Quebec (near Ottawa).

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

The maps of growth rates for the period 1986 to 1996 tell us how many jobs each city has added relative to its size, so that cities can be compared. Those cities that have special advantages for service activity will be the places that grow in the future. The difference in the employment totals (1996 value minus 1986 value) is called the absolute growth; and the absolute growth divided by the 1986 value is called the growth rate (absolute growth / 1986 value). Almost all places with a growth rate of more than 40% in total service employment over the decade are located in Alberta, British Columbia or within 200 kilometres of Toronto or Montréal.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Growth in health-care employment was almost universal across Canada. Only three places lost jobs, none losing more than 120 people, whereas Toronto added 44 000 health-care workers. Nationally, the growth in health care more or less reflects the overall distribution of population growth across the country. Since 1991, 96% of population growth has occurred in the four largest provinces (Ontario, Quebec, Alberta and British Columbia), and two-thirds of that growth took place in Ontario and British Columbia.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

The pattern of growth rates for public administration shows the most distinctive pattern of change. There were substantial declines, with more than half of the cities losing employment during the period 1986 to 1996. The federal capital (Ottawa) and the provincial capitals Halifax and Winnipeg suffered the greatest losses. The highest rates of growth occurred in coastal British Columbia and in small cities on the fringes of Toronto and Montréal.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Between 2001 and 2006, total employment in Canada increased at an annual average rate of 1.7%, the fastest rate increase among the Group of Seven (G7) nations. Italy's growth rate of 1.2% was second followed by France and the United States of America. Employment rose in every part of the country. Over the five years, the 1.7% annual average national employment growth rate was surpassed only in Alberta (2.9%) and British Columbia (2.1%) and the three territories.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, employment, map
Date modified: