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Found 10 records similar to Growth Rate of Public Service Employment, 1986 to 1996

Federal

Public-service activities are funded, located and administered by governments. The map shows the difference between the actual employment in all public-service activities and the expected level, based on the city's population. Unlike the various commercial sectors, the consumption of public-sector services is not closely related to income levels, so the expected levels of employment depend mainly on population size. Cities with more public-sector jobs than expected are specialized; those with negative values are deficient.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Health and education services now dominate the public sector, and have become important components of the local economy and social well-being. The map shows the difference between the actual employment in education services and the expected level, based on the city's population.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Health and education services now dominate the public sector, and have become important components of the local economy and social well-being. The map shows the difference between the actual employment in education and health activities and the expected level, based on the city's population. For the most part, these services are funded by provincial agencies, although local agencies may make location decisions. Education and health facilities are not closely related to income levels, so the expected levels of employment depend mainly on the population size.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Health and education services now dominate the public sector, and have become important components of the local economy and social well-being. The map shows the difference between the actual employment in health services and the expected level, based on the city's population.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Growth in health-care employment was almost universal across Canada. Only three places lost jobs, none losing more than 120 people, whereas Toronto added 44 000 health-care workers. Nationally, the growth in health care more or less reflects the overall distribution of population growth across the country. Since 1991, 96% of population growth has occurred in the four largest provinces (Ontario, Quebec, Alberta and British Columbia), and two-thirds of that growth took place in Ontario and British Columbia.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

The maps of growth rates for the period 1986 to 1996 tell us how many jobs each city has added relative to its size, so that cities can be compared. Those cities that have special advantages for service activity will be the places that grow in the future. The difference in the employment totals (1996 value minus 1986 value) is called the absolute growth; and the absolute growth divided by the 1986 value is called the growth rate (absolute growth / 1986 value). Almost all places with a growth rate of more than 40% in total service employment over the decade are located in Alberta, British Columbia or within 200 kilometres of Toronto or Montréal.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

The pattern of growth rates for public administration shows the most distinctive pattern of change. There were substantial declines, with more than half of the cities losing employment during the period 1986 to 1996. The federal capital (Ottawa) and the provincial capitals Halifax and Winnipeg suffered the greatest losses. The highest rates of growth occurred in coastal British Columbia and in small cities on the fringes of Toronto and Montréal.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Fifteen small and peripheral cities lost jobs between 1986 and 1996 in the education sector, but none more than 300. Toronto added almost 25 000 jobs in education during this period. Areas of slow growth, mostly rural or smaller centres, lost jobs in education as the birth rate declined, especially rural Quebec and across the northern periphery of the country. Nationally, the growth in the education sector more or less reflected the overall distribution of population growth across the country in, for example, Vancouver, Calgary, Edmonton, Toronto, Ottawa and Montréal.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Public administration includes employment at the three levels of government: federal, provincial and municipal. The map shows the difference between the actual employment in public administration and the expected level, based on the city's population. Cities with more public administration jobs than expected are specialized; those with negative values are deficient. In general, smaller cities are more likely to have high or low levels of specialization, whereas large cities tend to provide the full range of service activities and therefore have less overall specialization in services.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Access to services affects well-being, social participation, education, health and employment. Accessibility is important to quality of life, as it creates the potential to take advantage of opportunities for upward social mobility, and to access health services, goods and services within the community.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, quality of life
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