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Found 10 records similar to Service Industries - Specialization in Leisure Services, 1996

Federal

Business services, the most rapidly growing sector within commercial services, includes accountants, computer services and other kinds of consultants — all those activities that serve other businesses. This map shows the difference between the actual employment in business services and the expected level, based on the city's population and income. Like financial services, business services are strongly oriented to big cities and to high-income locations, and within cities they concentrate in downtown office buildings and financial districts.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

This map shows how commercial activity is distributed within urban areas and the impact of commercial services on the urban landscape, by mapping what proportion of stores (hence jobs) in an urban area that are found in industrial zones. Industrial zones are extensive areas zoned for industrial use that nowadays are home to wholesalers, big-box retailers and a variety of services and small office buildings. These are specialized destinations, often oriented to other businesses; not the kinds of places you stumble upon by accident. As the most recent form of commercial concentration, they are most often found in rapidly growing cities, especially the largest cities.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

This map shows the difference between the actual employment in financial services and the expected level, based on the city's population and income. The financial services have become an important part of present-day consumption, providing a variety of banking, insurance and investment services. Some activities act like convenience retail (banks and credit unions) and others are more like retail shopping activity (stockbrokers and insurance companies). Still others are oriented to businesses, or deal with each other in concentrated financial districts in large cities.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Commercial services, the activities operating within the private sector, are attracted to markets according to the population of the area they serve and the level of market income. Growth rates for leisure services were relatively slow in the eastern Prairie provinces and rapid in British Columbia and southern Ontario and Quebec. The very highest rates of growth were widely dispersed in the urban centres on the edge of metropolitan regions. These high-growth places are often those that cater to the recreational needs of nearby large cities.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

The map shows the two most important characteristics of markets: their size (measured by population) and the level of income - hence the ability to buy various kinds of services. The market is the amount of money available to purchase goods and services. The corporations that provide services (wholesale, retail, finance, business services, leisure services, personal services) to Canadian consumers visualize the country as a set of markets of varying sizes (the cities), and with different characteristics, especially the level of income - which directly affects the ability to consume.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

This map shows the difference between the actual employment in recreation services and the expected level, based on the city's population and income.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

This map shows the difference between the actual employment in food services and the expected level, based on the city's population and income.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

This map shows the difference between the actual employment in accommodation services and the expected level, based on the city's population and income.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

While the size of the market determines the amount of service activity within a city, it may have more service activity than indicated by the size of the market, and this surplus of facilities is called "centrality". A high index value of centrality implies that the city is serving an extensive region outside the city, as well as the urban market itself. Conversely, a deficiency of service facilities suggests that the city's external role is quite limited, or that it may even import goods and service from nearby centres. In general the agricultural centres of western Canada have the highest values of centrality, while the lower values are found in industrial cities of central Canada (Ontario and Quebec) or isolated resource towns.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
Federal

Public-service activities are funded, located and administered by governments. The map shows the difference between the actual employment in all public-service activities and the expected level, based on the city's population. Unlike the various commercial sectors, the consumption of public-sector services is not closely related to income levels, so the expected levels of employment depend mainly on population size. Cities with more public-sector jobs than expected are specialized; those with negative values are deficient.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, service industry
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