Open Government Portal

Found 10 records similar to Adjusted daily rainfall and snowfall dataset for Canada

Federal

The data consist of homogenized daily maximum, minimum and mean surface air temperatures for more than 330 locations in Canada; adjusted daily rainfall, snowfall and total precipitation for more than 460 locations. The data are given for the entire period of observation. Please refer to the papers below for detailed information regarding the procedures for homogenization and adjustment. References:
Mekis, É. and L.A. Vincent, 2011: An overview of the second generation adjusted daily precipitation dataset for trend analysis in Canada.

Last Updated: Jul. 28, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  temperature, precipitation, rainfall, snowfall, Climate, Temperature, Precipitation
Federal

The data consist of monthly, seasonal and annual means of homogenized daily maximum, minimum and mean surface air temperatures for more than 330 locations in Canada; monthly, seasonal and annual totals of adjusted daily rainfall, snowfall and total precipitation for more than 460 locations; homogenized monthly, seasonal and annual means of hourly surface wind speed at more than 110 locations; monthly, seasonal and annual means of hourly station and sea level pressure adjusted for more than 630 locations. The data are given for the entire period of observation. Please refer to the papers below for detailed information regarding the procedures for homogenization and adjustment. References

Mekis, É. and L.A. Vincent, 2011: An overview of the second generation adjusted daily precipitation dataset for trend analysis in Canada.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2000
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS WFS HTML PDF
Keywords:  surface air temperature; precipitation; surface pressure; surface wind speed, Weather and Climate, Provide Climate Information Products and Services, Expand Scientific Knowledge for Climate Monitoring and Prediction, National (CA), Climate, Climate change
Federal

The data consists of temperature indices based on homogenized daily maximum and minimum temperatures at 338 locations across Canada, and of precipitation indices based on adjusted daily rainfall, daily snowfall and daily precipitation amounts at 463 locations across the country. These indices were selected for their relevance to social and economic impact assessment in Canada and for the insights they could provide regarding changes in extreme climate conditions. Please refer to the papers below for detailed information regarding the adjustment procedures and the trends in the indices.

Last Updated: Jul. 28, 2021
Date Published: Jul. 30, 2019
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: TXT
Keywords:  climate change, climate trends, climate indices, daily temperature, daily precipitation, temperature extreme, precipitation extreme, Climate, Precipitation
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows two maps for the annual total precipitation. Annual precipitation is defined as the sum of rainfall and the assumed water equivalent of snowfall for a given year. A specific gravity of 0.1 for freshly fallen snow is used, which means that ten inches (25.4 cm) of freshly fallen snow is assumed to be equal to one inch (2.54 cm) of rain. The mean annual total precipitation and snowfall maps on this plate are primarily based on thirty-year data during the period 1921 to 1950 inclusive.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate with three maps that show the mean annual number of days with measurable precipitation, the mean annual number of days with measurable snowfall, and the variability of annual precipitation. A day with sufficient measurable precipitation (a precipitation day) is considered as a day on which the recorded rainfall amounts to one one-hundredth of an inch (0.0254 cm) or more, or the snowfall measured is one-tenth of an inch (0.254 cm) or more. At any one location the annual precipitation may vary considerably from one year to the next. This variability of annual precipitation is expressed in terms of the coefficient of variation.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a plate that shows four maps of the mean precipitation for spring (March to May), summer (June to August), fall (September to November) and winter (December to February). The total precipitation for any season is the sum of the rainfall and one-tenth of the snowfall for that particular three-month period. The mean seasonal precipitation is the mean of the seasonal totals during the period 1921 to 1950 inclusive.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, climate archives, meteorological data, meteorology, precipitation, weather
Federal

The Duck Lake (Saskatchewan) Geolysimeter precipitation intercomparison data are from a co-located precipitation gauge and deep groundwater observation well. The data published here are event based intercomparisons, collected between 2010 and 2016, binned into rain and snow events. Snowfall data observed by the precipitation gauge have been adjusted for wind bias using the SPICE (Solid Precipitation InterComparison Experiment) transfer functions (Kochendorfer et al., 2017a) and included for intercomparison. The data is described by Smith et al.

Last Updated: Jul. 31, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 24, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: XLSX HTML DOC
Keywords:  Precipitation, Geolysimeter, Intercomparison
Federal

The map shows the annual snowfall (in centimetres) based on the 30-year period 1941-1970. Snowfall is measured by inserting a ruler into the new snow at several points to obtain its depth and to estimate the degree of drifting or scouring that has occurred. The water equivalent of snowfall for most climatologically stations is estimated by simply assuming the freshly fallen snow has a density of 0.10 gram per cubic centimetre. On the average, this is a sound approximation over large parts of the country, but variations from 0.05 to 0.15 are common from storm to storm, and in the drier regions the average density is probably closer to 0.08 gram per cubic centimetre.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1978
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, hydrology, precipitation, water balance
Federal

The map shows the mean total precipitation in the month of October. October marks the transition from mainly rain to snowfall across northern Canada. Snowfall also occurs across much of the interior of southern Canada but in relatively small amounts that usually melt. October also marks the transition to the rainy season on the southern portion of British Columbia’s west coast.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, precipitation
Federal

The map shows the annual mean total precipitation. Over much of the continental interior of Canada, precipitation reaches its annual maximum in the summer months and falls as rain. October marks the transition from mainly rain to snowfall across northern Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, precipitation
Date modified: