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Found 10 records similar to Black Oystercatcher Population – Pacific Rim

Federal

This program assesses demographic parameters and breeding abundance of 5 species of ground (burrow) nesting seabirds: Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa) and Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata) at the Seabird Rocks Colony through population counts and capture-mark-recapture techniques. Counts of individuals at the colony are done 3-4 times throughout a breeding season (May-July) to estimate the size of the breeding populations. A banding (capture-mark-recapture) program to estimate annual survivorship of the two storm-petrel species is done via mist-net arrays on two consecutive nights in early May and/or mid-to-late July. This project seeks to track the present status of the ground and burrrow-nesting seabirds on Seabird Rocks and any recovery that may occur due to future habitat restoration and/or predator-control measures.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, Nesting seabirds, Breeding abundance, Annual survivorship, Pigeon Guillemot (Cepphus columba), Rhinoceros Auklet (Cerorhinca monocerata), Glaucous-winged Gull (Larus glaucescens), Leach's Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma leucorhoa), Fork-tailed Storm-Petrel (Oceanodroma furcata)
Federal

Bird sanctuaries areas of importance for the protection of migratory birds, their nests, and eggs. Nunavut has an abundance of sites favourable to the migratory habits of several bird species.

Last Updated: Jan. 26, 2017
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  conservation areas, demographic maps, map, migratory birds
Federal

Black swift (Cypseloides niger) have been listed as an Endangered Species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In Jasper National Park, black swifts nest in canyon waterfalls and may be affected by decreases in water flow on account of decreased snow pack and glacial melt, and specific recreational activities that may disturb nesting birds. Data are collected by trained observers during the breeding season to identify breeding sites to inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Black swift, Cypseloides niger, Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, COSEWIC
Federal

Black Oystercatcher breeding success is estimated by visually surveying known breeding habitat in key areas of Gwaii Haanas. Surveys are conducted twice a year during breeding season. Black Oysercatchers are very vulnerable to disturbances, predation of eggs and young, predators, oil spills and reduction of food sources due to global warming. They are also considered to be a keystone species in the north Pacific, and an indicator of the health of the rocky shoreline and intertidal community.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Black Oystercatcher, breeding, breeding success, keystone species, British Columbia, rocky shoreline, intertidal community
Federal

This project aims to capture population trends by estimating absolute abundance of American Black Bears (Ursus americanus) every 2-3 years and relative abundance of three forest mammals (American Black Bear, Grey Wolf (Canis lupus) and Black-tailed Deer (Odocoileus hemionus ssp.)) annually. Forty two 6.8 km2 grid cell units on the landscape are surveyed for animal presence three times per season between May and September using remote wildlife cameras. Cameras are cycled through the 42 sites over the course of the sampling season with each survey lasting ca.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, American Black Bear (Ursus americanus), Grey Wolf (Canis lupus), Black-tailed Deer (Odocoileus hemionus), Abundance, Occupancy, Remote Cameras
Federal

The abundance of bank swallow (Riparia riparia) nest holes within cliff and bank habitats along PEI National Park coastline is monitored. Previously, large historical colonies were surveyed annually, and every five years a complete census of the entire park shoreline was completed. As of 2010, a complete census is done annually along the coastline of PEI National Park following the breeding season. Nest holes are counted along the coast throughout PEI National Park by multiple observers.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, coastal, bank swallow, Riparia riparia, biodiversity, nest holes
Federal

In partnership with ECCC, Gwaii Haanas monitors five Marbled Murrelet colonies by using a radar station located offshore. As birds fly out to the ocean at dawn, and return at dusk, the radar data is used to estimate the number of birds per hectare of suitable nesting habitat. Sampling areas focus on estuarine areas where the watershed or catchment contains old growth stands likely to host nesting birds in June and July. Marbled Murrelets are unique among seabirds because of their nesting habits – non-colonial nesting on thick, moss-covered limbs of large, old growth trees.

Last Updated: Aug. 1, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Marbled Murrelet, radar, British Columbia, threatened species, old growth forest
Federal

Monitoring of the number of eggs and nests for the tern. Field data from 1992 to 2019. Many islands in the MANPRC are used by the terns for their nesting. The presence and great abundance of this species are characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 28, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Artic Tern, Sterna paradisaea, Common tern, Sterna hirundo, abundance, nest, egg, ecological integrity, coastal
Federal

Red-breasted mergansers (Mergus serrator) are colonial birds found on Tern Islands, a set of three small barrier islands separated by water at high tide located within Kouchibouguac National Park. These piscivorous sea ducks are indicators for the state of the breeding islands and associated marine or estuarine ecosystems, since nest distribution and productivity is closely related to habitat conditions such as the presence of marram grass (Ammophila breviligulata) in addition to sometimes sea lyme grass (Leymus mollis) or common yarrow (Achillea millefolium); while the occurrence of the species is also linked to the scope and abundance of fish resources. The purpose of the red-breasted merganser monitoring program is to determine the annual number of nesting attempts and to measure nest success, as these are important parameters that contribute to breeding population dynamics. The methods for this measure involve an annual census in mid-August where nests (i.e., a bowl with at least one egg) are located by systematically searching the vegetated regions on Tern Islands immediately following the completion of the breeding season.

Last Updated: Jun. 10, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  red-breasted merganser, Mergus serrator, colonial birds, piscivorous, sea duck, indicator species, Tern Islands, barrier islands, breeding success
Federal

Monitoring of the number of eggs and nests for the common eider. Field data between 1988 to 2015. Many islands in the MANPRC are used by the common eider for nesting. The presence and great abundance of this species are characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Common eider, Somateria mollissima dresseri, abondance, nest, egg, forest, ecological integrity
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