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Found 10 records similar to Aquatic Invasive Species of British Columbia

Federal

Existing invasive exotic species and the potential introduction of new invasive species pose a threat to forest biodiversity and function. The PEI National Park invasive species composite measure consists of two annual field measurements: the percentage of forest ecosystem with invasive species present (measured by proportion of 244, 441 m2 quadrats covering the forest ecosystem), and the percentage of total forest area (ha) with invasive species present. The measure includes four invasive plants and one insect: Garlic Mustard (Alliaria petiolata), Japanese Knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum), Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris), and Glossy Buckthorn (Frangula alnus), and Gypsy Moth (Lymantria dispar), which is measured for presence only.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, invasive species, garlic mustard, Alliaria petiolata, glossy buckthorn, Frangula alnus, Japanese knotweed, Polygonum cuspidatum, gypsy moth
Federal

Since 2006, the DFO Maritimes Biofouling Monitoring Program has conducted annual field surveys to monitor for the introduction, establishment and spread of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS ). To date, sampled species include the following:

Solitary Tunicates

i. clubbed tunicate, Styela clava (Herdman, 1881)

ii. vase tunicate, Ciona intestinalis (Linnaeus, 1776)

iii. European sea squirt, Ascidiella aspersa (Muller, 1776)

Colonial Tunicates

i. golden star tunicate Botryllus schlosseri (Pallas, 1766)

ii.

Last Updated: Jan. 15, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2018
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Aquatic Invasive Species, Marine Invertebrates, Ascidians, Tunicates, Fouling Organisms, Monitoring Network, Species Distribution, Species Abundance Data, Northwest Atlantic Ocean
Federal

Presence of exotic species often represents a level of disturbance in an ecosystem.The park samples invasive wetland plants along coastal transects, which include submerged areas. The focus of this measure are Eurasian watermilfoil and European phragmites. Currently the park has sufficient data only on the watermilfoil.

Last Updated: Oct. 10, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Wetlands, Invasive Plants, Eurasian watermilfoil, European phragmites, Beausoleil Island, Georgian Bay, Ontario
Federal

Aquatic invasive species pose economic and ecological threats to Canada's coastal waters. In response, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) has established monitoring programs to detect and track the spread of aquatic invasive species, including European Green Crab, in Canadian waters. Fukui traps have been deployed annually at both new and long-term monitoring locations throughout coastal British Columbia.

Last Updated: Apr. 8, 2020
Date Published: Jan. 31, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Aquatic Invasive Species; Green Crab; Monitoring, Aquatic animals, Marine biology, Invasive species
Federal

This program aims to capture the extent of eradicated English Ivy (Hedera helix) and two species of invasive beachgrasses (European beachgrass/European marram grass (Ammophila arenaria) and American beachgrass (Ammophila breviligulata) relative to the total extent mapped in the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. Areas of known or suspected distribution of invasive plants are mapped and treated as resources allow. The projects generally follow four phases: discovery, mapping, initial treatment (removal), followed by monitoring and additional treatments until the patch is free of the invasives. Our measure is assessed by comparing the area from which invasive plants have been removed to the sum of the area of occurrences mapped to date.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, English Ivy (Hedera helix), European beachgrass (Ammophila arenaria), American beachgrass (Ammophila breviligulata), Invasive species, Dune Ecosystem
Federal

Invasive alien plants (such as Japanese knotweed, woodland angelica) are considered a serious problem for many protected areas. Fundy National Park reports on the presence of priority invasive species in grid cells; the grid overlays the entire national park.

Last Updated: Jun. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  invasive alien plants, reed canary grass, Japanese knotweed, woodland angelica, New Brunswick
Federal

DFO Science monitors for AIS in the Gulf Region along with several provincial agencies, universities and NGOs. The data collected from DFO's biofouling monitoring program provides an overview of the distribution and abundance of Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) in the Gulf Region. This information can be used by the general public, scientists and DFO managers.

Last Updated: May 19, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 28, 2019
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Gulf of St. Lawrence, Botryllus schlosseri, Caprella mutica, Carcinus maenas, Ciona intestinalis, Codium fragile, Membranipora membranacea, Styela clava, Botrylloïdes violaceus
Federal

The Peace Athabasca Delta (PAD) is a dynamic deltaic ecosystem that is driven by natural, periodic floods. Vegetation communities naturally vary with floods and droughts, but changes in the long term can be detected. Specific concerns include: a shift away from aquatic communities, encroachment of shrubby species, and spread of invasive species. The Wood Buffalo National Park (WBNP) PAD Vegetation Invasive Species dataset documents the occurrence and cover of invasive plant species in permanent plots in the Peace Athabasca Delta.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Vegetation changes, invasive species, percent cover, transects, vegetation surveys, Peace-Athabasca Delta
Federal

At the establishment of Kouchibouguac National Park in 1969, remnants of past human history and intervention activities such as agriculture and wood harvesting since the mid-1880s have significantly influenced the Park’s current landscape. To this day, human-caused disturbance continues through visitor use, construction of trails, campgrounds and facilities, as well as maintenance work such as the mowing of roadsides. As expected, this long history of anthropogenic disturbances has greatly increased the prevalence of exotic vegetation species on the landscape. The invasion of natural ecosystems by these invasive plants is considered one of the biggest threats to the biodiversity and ecological integrity of these systems.

Last Updated: Jul. 3, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  exotic, invasive, alien, plant species, vascular flora, vegetation, Invasive Plant Index, IPI, landscape
Federal

Invasive plants can reduce biodiversity and compromise ecosystem function by out-competing native species, altering nutrient cycling, destabilizing soils and causing erosion, among other impacts. Prevention of colonization by weedy invaders is achieved through rapid restoration and reduced disturbance, both providing an advantage to native species to resist future invasions by non-natives. Jasper National Park monitors non-native species and carry outs control measures where non-native species have the potential to threaten vulnerable habitats and ecosystem in the Park.

Last Updated: Jul. 26, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, invasive plants
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