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Found 10 records similar to Stream flow - Kejimkujik

Federal

Stream hydrology strongly affects habitat quality for most stream-dwelling species, and is affected by both climate and land use. This measure, which is colocated with stream temperature regime, reports on flow parameters in 10-12 park streams over time - using in-situ water level data loggers, as well as hydrometric stations.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Hydrology, Stream Flow, Water Level, Environment Canada, data loggers, Newfoundland
Provincial

Stream flow data are available for a number of streams across the province. New Stream flow data is available from June through September. Those who hold a Water Withdrawal for Irrigation Purposes Permit can use this tool to confirm the water flow in Island streams, and to determine whether they may legally draw water for irrigation purposes.

Last Updated: Jun. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 29, 2021
Organization: Government of Prince Edward Island
Formats: XML HTML RDF CSV other RSS
Keywords:  stream, river, creek, brook, monitoring, irrigation
Federal

Hydrological patterns determine water depth, flow intensity, duration, and frequency of flooding, as well as low flow periods. Water levels in streams are not considered stable, but fluctuate seasonally. Hydrologic conditions primarily affect abiotic factors such as habitat structure, temperature and water chemistry, which in turn determine the biotic components (species composition, species richness, primary productivity) of the stream ecosystem. In PEI National Park, stream discharge (m3/sec) is predicted in four streams within PEI National Park using Onset HOBO U20 water level loggers and rating curves generated in four small 1 – 3rd order streams.

Last Updated: Mar. 24, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, hydrology, water level, flow intensity, Richards-Baker Index (RBI), stream flow index
Federal

Water temperature is a critical variable in stream ecology, and in particular has direct implications for fish populations. Automated data loggers are being used to record year-round hourly measurments of water temperature in various watersheds in Torngat Mountains national park. Note that because the data loggers being used (Hobo U20) also records hourly water level readings this measure is co-located with a stream hydrology measure.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream temperature, automated data loggers, Labrador
Federal

Hydrology is a key factor affecting biodiversity and the ecological functioning of aquatic and riparian ecosystems through sediment transport, erosion, water chemistry, etc. Automated data loggers are being used to record year-round hourly measurments of absolute in-stream pressure, absolute barometric pressure and water level in headwater streams of the Ivitak focal watershed, in Torngat Mountains national park. Note that because the data loggers being used (Hobo U20) also records hourly water temperature readings this measure is co-located with a stream temperature measure.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream hydrology, automated data loggers, hydrologic parameters, Ivitak watershed, Labrador
Provincial

This dataset shows length weighted connectivity values summarized by hydrologic unit code (HUC) for a provincial stream connectivity indicator that assesses connectivity for aquatic organisms in stream networks. The stream connectivity indicator supports evaluation and reporting on indicator condition over time and provides information to support management of watercourse crossings. The stream connectivity indicator produces an estimate of the average connectivity in a stream network, considering the movement requirements of local species and the locations of watercourse crossings. The indicator is calculated and summarized using hydrologic unit codes (HUCs).

Last Updated: May 3, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 24, 2021
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: SHP XML HTML other
Keywords:  alberta, barrier passability, canada, connectivity status, cumulative effects, inlandwaters, prioritization, road crossings, watersheds
Federal

Stream thermal regime has important consequences for aquatic organisms, and is sensitive to climate and land use. The Park is monitoring thermal regimes at 10 sites annually from spring to fall using temperature loggers. The water temperature is recorded hourly and these data used to assess the suitability of the thermal environment of streams for Brook Trout.

Last Updated: Jun. 27, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Stream Thermal Regime, Salmonid temperature stress, Temperature Loggers, Newfoundland
Federal

Benthic macro-invertebrate diversity, stream hydrology, water chemistry, climate, geology, and landcover are collected at randomly selected sites using a standard protocol for the assessment of stream condition and are being monitored both at reference and impacted sites. The overall scope or aim of this measure is the use of a reference condition approach model capable of assessing the ecological integrity of streams and rivers in the eight national mountain parks of Western Canada.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  benthic invertebrates, habitat, stream, aquatic, freshwater, Alberta
Federal

Brook trout are top predators in aquatic ecosystems at Kejimkujik that integrate the effects of stressors throughout the aquatic trophic structure. They are sensitive to a variety of stressors, including acidification, changes in water quality, climate change, fishing pressure, exotic species introductions, trophic structure alterations, land use change, and watershed fragmentation. The monitoring program tracks Brook trout population status, as assessed by relative abundance and trout condition at two watersheds in Kejimkujik. Volunteer anglers record morphometric and catch per unit effort data during the months of April, May and June for 3 years in a row every 5 years.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Brook trout, Stressors, Population status, Nova Scotia
Federal

The Common loon is a highly visible water bird inhabiting many of the lakes within Kejimkujik and the greater park ecosystem. It is a top predator in freshwater ecosystems in the area and is sensitive to a variety of stressors, including mercury bio-accumulation, acidification, water level fluctuation and human disturbance. The monitoring program tracks loon population status, by recording the number of adult pairs and number of chicks on focal lakes at Kejimkujik. Monitoring occurs twice annually in June and August using field observations from volunteers and park staff.

Last Updated: Oct. 17, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Freshwater, Common Loon, Stressors, Abundance and recruitment rate, Nova-Scotia
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