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Found 10 records similar to Research at a Glance: National Justice Survey 2017 - Mandatory Minimum Penalties (MMPs)

Federal

In general, Canadians are not supportive of the current mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) regime and prefer a more individualized approach to sentencing.

We also found:

Most Canadians indicated that they have a low to moderate level of knowledge of MMPs (52% low and 28% moderate).

Over three quarters (77%) of Canadians believed that in general, applying the same minimum sentence to all offenders who are convicted of the same offence is now fair and appropriate. Only 16% of Canadians believed MMPs lead to fair sentences.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Mar. 2, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Judges, Criminal justice system, Convictions
Federal

What we found:

Young people noted that the most important factors judges should consider in fair and equitable sentencing are personal circumstances and history of the accused person, and the nature of the crime, including the context, severity and motive for the crime. Ultimately, young people did not believe that mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) were beneficial because they limit judicial discretion.

Last Updated: Nov. 20, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Court decisions, Research, Justice system, judges, Criminal justice, Youth
Federal

To inform policy develop, public engagement and communications, and to support its mandate, the Department of Justice commissions periodic national surveys to explore Canadians' perception, understanding and priorities on justice-related issues.

This 2017 survey focuses on views and perceptions of the criminal justice system (CJS), in order to inform the ongoing criminal justice system review being undertaken by the Minister of Justice. It seeks to engage with people in all regions of Canada and to promote government transparency and openness. Specifically, the study explores Canadians’ views and perceptions of:

Sentencing (e.g., judicial discretion, sentencing considerations, guidelines)
Mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs)
Administration of justice offences (AOJOs)
Use of diversion/alternative measures
Restorative justice and problem-solving approaches to justice
Performance measurement and confidence in the CJS

Last Updated: Aug. 8, 2019
Date Published: Mar. 28, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, National Justice Survey, Community Engagement
Federal

To inform policy develop, public engagement and communications, and to support its mandate, the Department of Justice commissions periodic national surveys to explore Canadians' perception, understanding and priorities on justice-related issues.

This 2017 survey focuses on views and perceptions of the criminal justice system (CJS), in order to inform the ongoing criminal justice system review being undertaken by the Minister of Justice. It seeks to engage with people in all regions of Canada and to promote government transparency and openness. Specifically, the study explores Canadians’ views and perceptions of:

Sentencing (e.g., judicial discretion, sentencing considerations, guidelines) Mandatory minimum penalties (MMPs) Administration of justice offences (AOJOs) Use of diversion/alternative measures Restorative justice and problem-solving approaches to justice Performance measurement and confidence in the CJS.

Last Updated: Aug. 14, 2019
Date Published: Mar. 28, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: DOC CSV
Keywords:  Applied Research, Legal services, Surveys, Annual reports, Justice system
Federal

Readers Note: This publication presents results of an online public opinion survey completed by a sample of Canadians who received an invitation through email, Facebook and Twitter (called an "open link" sample; see Method for more details). This survey mirrored a survey conducted with a representative sample of Canadians, the results of which are available at Research on Justice Issues

Most respondents believe that diversion of accused people from the courts, should be the preferred response in some types of offences/situations. They also believe that increased use of diversion could make the criminal justice system (CJS) more efficient and effective. The majority of respondents believe that judges should have at least some degree of discretion and flexibility when deciding a sentence.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Jul. 2, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Judges, Criminal justice system, Convictions
Federal

Most Canadians feel that sentencing guidelines are the best way to ensure a fair sentence and they believe that sentencing would be more consistent with such guidelines. Many Canadians also believe that Canada should consider having a sentencing commission, and that most important activity of this body would be to give judges guidelines for sentencing decisions.

What we also found:

Seven in ten (71%) Canadians indicated that the best approach to sentencing is to provide guidelines while sill allowing for a judge's discretion.

More than eight in ten (83%) thought that guidelines for sentencing would help making sentencing more consistent (only 4% did not believe that this would be the case) and that Canada should consider having set guidelines (81%).

Last Updated: Nov. 12, 2019
Date Published: Mar. 5, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Judges, Criminal justice system, Convictions
Federal

To inform policy development, public engagement and communications, and to support its mandate, the Department of Justice commissions periodic national surveys to understand Canadians’ perceptions, understanding, and priorities on justice-related issues. Specifically, the study measures awareness, knowledge, and confidence in the criminal justice system and criminal law; examines Canadians’ perceptions of the criminal justice system, the values they want the criminal justice system to reflect, and priorities with respect to criminal justice issues; and Canadians’ expectations of the criminal justice system to support reforms and new initiatives in this area. A large scale survey of 4,200 Canadians on awareness and top-of-mind perceptions,
values and expectations regarding the criminal justice system. Survey respondents were randomly sampled from EKOS’ in-house panel (Probit1).

Last Updated: Oct. 8, 2019
Date Published: Jul. 19, 2017
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML DOC
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Canada's Court System, Laws, Canadian Constitution, Restorative Justice, Judicial Structures, Rule of Law, Justice System Survey, Community Engagement
Federal

Canadians indicated that they are not very familiar with restorative justice (RJ), but after receiving an explanation, the majority of Canadians support the use of RJ and see the process as an effective way to repair the harms caused by crime. What we also found:
Most Canadians (87%) indicated that victims should be able to meet with the offender and tell them about the impacts of the crime if they wish to do so. Over half (64%) of Canadians indicated that RJ should be available to all victims and offenders, regardless of the offence type, as long as both the victim and offender want to take part in the process and the offender admits his or her guilt. Given the lack of knowledge about RJ, it is not surprising that some Canadians (39%) still have questions or concerns about the RJ process.

Last Updated: Nov. 22, 2018
Date Published: Mar. 8, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Justice system, Research, Consultations, Legal issues, Restorative Justice
Federal

The following tables contain data on administrative monetary penalties (AMPs) issued by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) as part of compliance actions, as permitted under the Nuclear Safety and Control Act. In the current tables, which contains details on companies and individuals, data more than two years old is removed as per CNSC policy in conjunction with the annual update to the CSNC’s Regulatory actions Web page (https://www.cnsc-ccsn.gc.ca/eng/acts-and-regulations/regulatory-action/index.cfm). The historical dataset does not contain this identifying information, and serves to illustrate trends in penalties issued over the longer term.

Last Updated: Nov. 27, 2019
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2019
Organization: Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Administrative monetary penalty, AMP, enforcement, penalty, nuclear
Federal

Prior to the introduction of the Marihuana for Medical Purposes Regulations (MMPR), the Medical Marihuana Access Regulations (MMARs) extremely limited access to cannabis to a small number of conditions and circumstances and only when authorized by a specialist. Since 2008, Veterans Affairs Canada (VAC) has provided coverage for the cost of marijuana for medical purposes (MMP) to Veterans who obtained the product in accordance with Health Canada regulations. Under the MMARs , access was in limited circumstances and the number of Veterans receiving MMP were appropriately low. On April 1st, 2014, Health Canada released new regulations which eliminated the need to meet certain health criteria before obtaining MMP.

Last Updated: Jan. 5, 2019
Date Published: Nov. 15, 2016
Organization: Veterans Affairs Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Veterans Affairs Canada, VAC, Marijuana for medical purposes, Internal audit, Evaluation, Veterans
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