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Found 10 records similar to Shoreline Segmentation with Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique (SCAT) Classification

Federal

The North Coast of British Columbia dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline segmentation data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: May 12, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, British Columbia (BC), Water - Drainage regions - Pacific Coastal, Water - Ocean basin - Pacific Ocean, Oceans
Federal

This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place.

Last Updated: Nov. 15, 2019
Date Published: May 12, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, Ontario (ON), Water - Drainage regions - Great Lakes, Oceans
Federal

The Atlantic dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and estuarine shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where treatment or cleanup activities take place.

Last Updated: Jan. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 12, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, Atlantic - Prince Edward Island (PE), Atlantic - New Brunswick (NB), Atlantic - Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Atlantic - Nova Scotia (NS), Quebec (QC), Water - Drainage regions - Maritime Coastal
Federal

This dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database and it covers various locations across the Canadian Arctic i.e. James Bay, Resolute Bay and the south coast of Devon Island, the south-west coast of Hudson Bay, Labrador Coast, Victoria Strait, Beaufort Sea, and the North-east coast of Baffin Island. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone.

Last Updated: Jan. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 11, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, Territories - Northwest Territories (NT), Atlantic - Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), Territories - Yukon (YT), Territories - Nunavut (NU), Water - Ocean basin - Hudson Bay, Water - Ocean basin - Arctic Ocean
Federal

The Quebec—Saint-Lawrence River dataset is part of Environment and Climate Change Canada’s Shoreline Classification and Pre-Spill database. Shoreline classification data has been developed for use by the Environmental Emergencies Program of Environment and Climate Change Canada for environmental protection purposes. Marine and freshwater shorelines are classified according to the character (substrate and form) of the upper intertidal (foreshore) or upper swash zone (Sergy, 2008). This is the area where oil from a spill usually becomes stranded and where the treatment or cleanup activities take place.

Last Updated: Nov. 15, 2019
Date Published: May 11, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS FGDB/GDB HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Other, Oversee and Manage Site Conditions, Respond to Environmental Emergencies, Quebec (QC), Water - Major drainage area - St. Lawrence, Resources management
Federal

With the changing climate conditions, marine traffic along Canada’s coastal regions has increased over the past couple of decades and the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil-spill-related emergencies is critical. Baseline coastal information, such as shoreline form, substrate, and vegetation type, is required for prioritizing operations, coordinating onsite spill response activities (i.e. Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique [SCAT]), and providing information for wildlife and ecosystem management. Between 2010 and 2016, georeferenced high-definition videography and photos were collected for various study sites along the north coast of Canada.

Last Updated: Oct. 13, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 15, 2020
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: ZIP WMS JPG HTML PDF ESRI REST
Keywords:  Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Environmental emergencies, Environmental protection
Federal

With the changing climate conditions, marine traffic along Canada’s coastal regions has increased over the past couple of decades and the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil-spill-related emergencies is critical. Baseline coastal information, such as shoreline form, substrate, and vegetation type, is required for prioritizing operations, coordinating onsite spill response activities (i.e. Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique [SCAT]), and providing information for wildlife and ecosystem management. Between 2010 and 2017, georeferenced high-definition videography and photos were collected for various study sites across coastal Canada.

Last Updated: Dec. 9, 2020
Date Published: Aug. 15, 2020
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: TXT ZIP WMS HTML PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Environmental emergencies, Environmental protection
Federal

In the face of increasing economic opportunities in Canada's northern regions, the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil spill related emergencies in particular is critical. While significant efforts have been put towards documenting baseline coastal information across Canada’s southern regions, there is a large information gap regarding Arctic shorelines. Baseline coastal information such as shoreline form, substrate and vegetation type, is required for operational prioritization, coordination of on-site spill response activities (i.e., SCAT: Shoreline Cleanup and Assessment Technique), as well as providing valuable information for wildlife and ecosystem management. A standardized methodology was developed to map shoreline characteristics at six study sites across the Canadian Arctic: James Bay, Resolute Bay, Hudson Bay, Labrador Coast, Victoria Strait, and Beaufort Sea.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 10, 2015
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: SHP PDF JSON CSV HTML
Keywords:  Canadian Arctic, shorelines, oil spill, emergency preparedness, sensitivity mapping, videography, Beaufort Sea, coastal management, coastal studies
Federal

With the changing climate conditions, marine traffic along Canada’s coastal regions has increased over the past couple of decades and the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil-spill-related emergencies is critical. Baseline coastal information, such as shoreline form, substrate, and vegetation type, is required for prioritizing operations, coordinating onsite spill response activities (i.e. Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique [SCAT]), and providing information for wildlife and ecosystem management. Between 2013 and 2019, georeferenced high-definition videography and photos were collected for various study sites along the west coast.

Last Updated: Oct. 13, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 15, 2020
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: ZIP WMS JPG HTML PDF ESRI REST
Keywords:  Assess Status of Species, Protect Species Well-Being, Environmental emergencies, Environmental protection
Federal

With the changing climate conditions, marine traffic along Canada’s coastal regions has increased over the past few decades and the need to improve our state of preparedness for oil-spill-related emergencies is critical. Baseline coastal information, such as shoreline form, substrate, and vegetation type, is required for prioritizing operations, coordinating onsite spill response activities (i.e., Shoreline Cleanup Assessment Technique [SCAT]), and providing information for wildlife and ecosystem management. Between 2011 and 2016, georeferenced high-definition videography and photos were collected for various study sites along the east coast. The study areas include Labrador, Bay of Fundy and Chedabucto Bay in Atlantic Canada.

Last Updated: Oct. 13, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 15, 2020
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: ZIP WMS JPG HTML PDF ESRI REST
Keywords:  Assess Status of Species, Protect Species Well-Being, Environmental emergencies, Environmental protection
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