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Found 10 records similar to Potential Impacts: Sensitivity of River Regions to Climate Change

Federal

The sensitivity of peatlands to climate warming is shown on this map. Peatlands are massive deposits of peat, a material consisting largely of organic residue that acts as a natural sink for carbon. With global warming, however, they have the potential to become immense sources of greenhouse gases, and contribute significantly to further warming. The geographic areas where peatland will be most affected are the Hudson Bay lowlands, the Mackenzie River valley region and the northern parts of Alberta and Manitoba.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

Wind erosion risk for unprotected soils in areas sensitive to climatic change is shown on this map. The regions that would have the highest sensitivity to a warming climate are likely to occur in the southern and central Prairies and in the southernmost part of Ontario. This risk of wind erosion is based on the nature of local climate and vegetation. Areas with dryer, warmer climates and with sparse vegetation cover are more vulnerable to wind erosion.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

Sensitivity of the coastlines of Canada to the expected rise in sea level is shown on the map. Sensitivity here means the degree to which a coastline may experience physical changes such as flooding, erosion, beach migration, and coastal dune destabilization. Climate warming is expected to cause warming of the oceans and the partial melting of glaciers and ice-caps, resulting in a global rise in sea level. Two major regions of high sensitivity are identified: Atlantic Canada and parts of the Beaufort Sea coast.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Provincial

This data set includes information on sampling locations, water chemistry and chlorophyll collected at 18 locations in the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River and 4 locations in Lake Simcoe.

Last Updated: Jul. 22, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 11, 2020
Organization: Government of Ontario
Formats: PDF CSV XLS HTML
Keywords:  Environment and Natural Resources, Environment and energy, Government information
Federal

A simulation showing the projected changes in June to August mean temperatures from the period 1975 to 1995 to the period 2080 to 2100 is shown on this map. There would be typically more warming over land than over oceans, at higher latitudes than at lower latitudes, but the warming would be smaller in the summer than in the winter. Temperatures would generally increase as a consequence of the projected increase in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The results are based on climate change simulations made with the Coupled Global Climate Model developed by Environment Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

A simulation of projected changes in winter (December to February) precipitation from the period 1961 to 1990 to the period 2040 to 2060 for Canada is shown on this map. In general, precipitation would increase as the century progresses and the climate warms. Projected precipitation changes are not evenly distributed geographically or seasonally. Precipitation is projected to decrease slightly for some higher latitude regions.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

A simulation of the projected changes in December to February mean temperatures from the period 1975 to 1995 to the period 2040 to 2060 is shown on this map. According to this projection, the Arctic would experience the greatest warming followed by other areas in northern Canada and central and northern Asia. Temperatures would generally increase as a result of the projected increases in greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere. The results are based on climate change simulations made with the Coupled Global Climate Model developed by Environment Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

A simulation of projected changes in annual mean temperatures from the period 1975 to 1995 to the period 2040 to 2060 is shown on this map. According to this projection, the Arctic would experience the greatest annual mean warming followed by other areas in northern Canada and central and northern Asia. Temperatures would generally increase as a result of projected increases in greenhouse gas concentration in the atmosphere. The results are based on climate change simulations made with the Coupled Global Climate Model developed by Environment Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

A simulation of projected changes in June to August mean temperatures from the period 1975 to 1995 to the period 2040 to 2060 is shown on this map. According to this projection, there would be typically more warming over land than over oceans, at higher latitudes than at lower latitudes, and in winter compared to summer. Temperatures would generally increase as a consequence of the projected increase in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere. The results are based on climate change simulations made with the Coupled Global Climate Model developed by Environment Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
Federal

A simulation of projected changes in annual mean precipitation from the period 1961 to 1990 to the period 2040 to 2060 for Canada is shown on this map. In general, precipitation would increase as the century progresses and the climate warms and this is reflected in the annual average pattern. Also, the simulations show there are regions of both increasing and decreasing precipitation. Warmer surface temperature would speed up the hydrological cycle at least partially, resulting in faster evaporation and more precipitation.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  climate change, map
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