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Found 10 records similar to Age Structure, 2001 - Later Working Years by Census Subdivision (35 - 64 years)

Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

New census data on age and sex show that as of May 15, 2001, the median age of Canada's population reached an all-time high of 37.6 years, an increase of 2.3 years from 35.3 in 1996. This was the biggest census-to-census increase in a century. Median age is the point where exactly one-half of the population is older, and the other half is younger. The nation's median age has been rising steadily since the end of the baby boom in 1966, when it was only 25.4 years.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, demographic statistics, map
Federal

This map shows female median income for the female population 15 years of age and over reporting income in 1995 (not including institutional residents). The distribution of incomes above the national female median of $14 508 were most prominent in Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Ottawa-Hull, Montréal, and Quebec. Based on the 1996 Census, the number of women reporting income has steadily increased over the years. In 1995, women represented nearly half of all income recipients, compared with 17% in 1990.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  economy, map, personal income
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