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Found 10 records similar to Swallows - Jasper

Federal

The abundance of bank swallow (Riparia riparia) nest holes within cliff and bank habitats along PEI National Park coastline is monitored. Previously, large historical colonies were surveyed annually, and every five years a complete census of the entire park shoreline was completed. As of 2010, a complete census is done annually along the coastline of PEI National Park following the breeding season. Nest holes are counted along the coast throughout PEI National Park by multiple observers.

Last Updated: Mar. 12, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  PEI National Park, coastal, bank swallow, Riparia riparia, biodiversity, nest holes
Federal

Avian Health and Contaminants

Data on tree swallow clutch size and nestling weight, wing length, organ size, and measures of thyroid function were collected from study sites near active mine pits, tailings ponds and processing plants on oil sands leases in Alberta, and at relatively undisturbed reference sites south of Fort McMurray, Alberta. Analysis of the birds’ reproductive performance has revealed that neither hatching success nor fledging success differed between industrial and reference sites. PAHs, alkylated PAHs, and dibenzothiophenes were measured in tree swallow nestling tissues and fecal samples. Tree swallow nestlings on the industrial sites had higher or comparable PAH concentrations in both their muscle and fecal samples, compared to tree swallow nestlings on the reference sites.

Last Updated: Jul. 22, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 26, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  oil sands, monitoring, biodiversity, contaminants, swallows, wildlife
Federal

Aquatic bird eggs are being collected for contaminants analysis. Egg collections in the Peace-Athabasca Delta area support Parks Canada’s activities at Wood Buffalo National Park and the multi-stakeholder Peace-Athabasca Ecosystem Monitoring Program. This monitoring activity employs repeated censuses of birds and builds on initial egg collections made in 2009 from Egg Island (Lake Athabasca) and Wood Buffalo National Park, with the goal of evaluating contaminant burdens, contaminant sources and changes in sources through time. Egg samples are collected from colonial waterbirds California Gulls (Larus californicus), Herring Gulls (Larus argentatus), Ring-billed Gulls (Larus delawarensis), Caspian Terns (Hydroprogne caspia) and Common Terns (Sterna hirundo) and insectivorous birds Bank Swallows (Riparia riparia), Cliff Swallows (Petrochelidon pyrrhonota) and Tree Swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) to monitor health and contaminant levels of aquatic and terrestrial birds in the oil sands region and in reference areas.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 22, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  oil sands; monitoring; biodiversity; contaminants; colonial waterbirds; swallows, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Game (Wildlife)
Federal

Tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) nest boxes are installed in oil sands area and in reference locations to monitor contaminant levels and impacts on tree swallow nestlings. The exposure to tree swallow nestlings to air-borne oil sands-related contaminants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is assessed using passive air samplers. Measures of avian health are examined in relation to location of sampling and contaminants measured.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 6, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  oil sands; monitoring; biodiversity; contaminants; swallows, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants, Observation/Measurement, Assess Status of Species, Protect Species Well-Being, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Game (Wildlife)
Federal

Common nighthawk (Chordeiles minor) inventory supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Common nighthawks are a Threatened Species protected under the Federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). Common nighthawks migrate north between early May to mid-June to breed in or near open or semi-open sites across a variety of habitats. During the breeding season, data are collected at these sites by audio recorders to determine presence/nesting and inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Species at Risk Act, SARA, Chordeiles minor, Common nighthawk
Federal

Black swift (Cypseloides niger) have been listed as an Endangered Species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In Jasper National Park, black swifts nest in canyon waterfalls and may be affected by decreases in water flow on account of decreased snow pack and glacial melt, and specific recreational activities that may disturb nesting birds. Data are collected by trained observers during the breeding season to identify breeding sites to inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Black swift, Cypseloides niger, Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, COSEWIC
Federal

The Water Quality Index (WQI), developed by the Canadian Council of Ministers of Environment (CCME) is used to assess the water quality of Pukaskwa’s rivers and streams. Three key stressors (acidification, eutrophication and metal loading) are assessed using nine parameters [pH, aluminum, calcium, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved oxygen concentration, iron (Fe), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb)]. Water samples are collected three times a year (spring, summer and fall) from each sampling site (White River, Willow River, Oiseau Creek, White Gravel River, North Swallow River, Swallow, Cascade River, Tagouche Creek and Imogene Creek). Samples are sent to the National Laboratory for Environmental Testing (NLET), Burlington, ON, to test for metals and to Natural Resources Canada, Sault Ste.

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Water Quality Index, WQI, Pukaskwa, acidification, eutrophication, nutrients, metals, YSI, Stream
Federal

Benthic samples are collected from 6 streams (Oiseau Creek, White Gravel River, North Swallow River, Swallow River, Tagouche Creek and Imogene Creek) in mid to late September using standarized methods for collecting invertebrates developed by the Canadian Biomonitoring Network (CABIN). Five sub-measures are calculated for the status of this measure; family richness, percent oligochaeta, the Hilsenhoff family biotic index (HfBI), Ephemeroptera - Plecoptera - Tricoptera (EPT) index and a multivariate community metric (90th percentile Hellinger's Distance).

Last Updated: Apr. 15, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Benthic, Pukaskwa, CABIN, richness, Hilsenhoff, EPT index, Hellinger’s Distance, Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera
Federal

Since 2009, up to nine (9) streams (White River, Willow River, Oiseau Creek, White Gravel River, North Swallow River, Swallow River, Cascade River, Tagouche Creek and Imogene Creek) are monitored with stream temperature HOBO loggers to assess thermal suitability for Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). In 2016 and 2017, a second logger was deployed at each of the streams. Loggers are deployed in each stream during the summer, between Lake Superior and the first barrier. Data from the two loggers are analyzed separately for each week and the lower maximum weekly trimean temperature from each stream is used.

Last Updated: Jul. 10, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, Pukaskwa, HOBO logger, streams, thermal
Federal

Birds adapted to alpine ecosystems are often sensitive to habitat and climate changes because of their niche specialization. For example, birds that are specialized to breeding in colder alpine conditions may be outcompeted by more generalist species if warmer conditions arise. Yearly data are collected at these sites using audio recorders to determine indices of bird diversity and occupancy trends to inform management.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, birds, alpine ecosystem
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