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Found 10 records similar to Pollutant Transformation, Ground-based Pollutant Monitoring Multi Parameters - Preliminary Data - Fort McKay, Oil Sands Region

Federal

Long Term Air Pollutant and Meteorological Monitoring at Fort McKay’s Oski-ôtin site: Validated data

Continuous monitoring of multiple air pollutants along with meteorological conditions began in Fort McKay at the Oski-ôtin site in August 2013. The purpose of Oski-ôtin’s enhanced monitoring is to gain a clearer picture of the mixture, transport and fate of air pollutants produced from the different oil sands related activities. Compared to the pre-existing monitoring conducted by Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) in Fort McKay and throughout the region, the Oski-ôtin site provides measurements for a larger number of pollutants using research grade instruments (configured to be more precise at lower concentrations). Instruments located at this site also monitor pollutants, winds and temperatures at multiple heights above the ground.

Last Updated: Jul. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 16, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, ozone, acidifying gases, sulphur dioxide, particulate matter mass, PM composition, CAPMoN, filter pack, polycyclic aromatic compounds
Federal

Measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) using sunphotometers are being made in the oil sands region (at Fort McKay’s Oski-ôtin site, and Fort McMurray). AOD is a measure of the degree to which atmospheric aerosols absorb or scatter sunlight anywhere from the top of the atmosphere to the ground. These tiny solid or liquid particles can have natural or anthropogenic sources including dust, sea salt, smoke, or pollutants. Measurements of AOD made in the oil sands region can be compared with data collected at other Canadian locations from the AErosol RObotic CANadian (AEROCAN) network, such as Kelowna, BC; Lethbridge, AB; Bratt’s Lake and Waskesiu, SK; and Yellowknife, NT.

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 7, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ambient air, oil sands, aerosols, satellite, remote sensing, modelling, Ground-based Aerosol Optical Depth, Oil sands, Air quality
Federal

LIDAR (LIght Detection And Ranging) is a measurement technique capable of observing the complex vertical structure of the atmosphere. Specifically, information can be provided related to the existence and extent of aerosols and clouds with high spatial (4 m vertical) and temporal (1 min) resolution, making it well-suited for understanding atmospheric dynamics and transport processes. ECCC researchers designed, built and deployed autonomous ground-based aerosol LIDAR systems to three different locations in the oil sands region – AMS13 (November 2012 to September 2013), Oski-ôtin (October 2013 to present) and Mannix (July 2013 to March 2016). Details of the instrument by Strawbridge, 2013 can be found in Atmos.

Last Updated: Jul. 19, 2019
Date Published: May 12, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ambient air, Remote Sensing, aerosol profile, LIDAR, oil sands, Air quality
Federal

Air emissions from oil sands development can come from a number of sources including industrial smokestacks, tailings ponds, transportation, and dust from mining operations. Air quality monitoring under the Joint Canada-Alberta Implementation Plan for the Oil Sands is designed to determine the contribution of emissions from oil sands activities to local and regional air quality and atmospheric deposition both now and in the future. Ambient air quality data include:

  • Filter Pack (24-hour integrated concentrations of particle-bound SO2-4, NO-3, Cl-, NH+4, Ca2+, Mg2+, Na+, K+ and gaseous SO2 and HNO3 collected daily by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network)

  • Total Gaseous Mercury (hourly mixing ratios measured by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network and Prairie and Northern Region)

  • Atmospheric speciated mercury (Hg) (2-hour average concentrations of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM), reactive gaseous Hg (RGM), and Hg on PM2.5 (total particulate Hg - TPM)

  • Comprehensive set of measurements collected from an aircraft (various time resolutions) covering an area of 140,000 km2 over the oil sands region

  • Comprehensive set of measurements collected from the Fort McKay Oski-ôtin monitoring site

  • Ozone (hourly mixing ratios measured by the Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network)

  • Ozone Vertical Profiles (ozone mixing ratios as a function of height) measured by the Canadian Ozone Sonde Network

  • Aerosol Optical Depth (measure of the degree to which the presence of aerosols in the atmosphere prevents the transmission of light, from the ground to the top of the atmosphere) measured as part of the AErosol RObotic CANadian (AEROCAN) network

  • Satellite overpass data have a relatively high spatial resolution over the Oil Sands region to produce images and geo-referenced data of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and sulphur dioxide (SO2) “vertical column density” (which correlates with surface concentration)

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: May 7, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Air - Quality, Provide Air Quality/UV Information Products and Services, Monitor Air Quality and UV Parameters and Manage Data, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Air quality, Oil sands
Federal

Total gaseous mercury (TGM) data are collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada at two Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Stations (AMS). The instrument at WBEA AMS 11 was relocated to WBEA AMS 13 in Spring 2014. TGM data from the oil sands region are available for: WBEA AMS 6 - Patricia McInnes, located in Fort McMurray, Alberta, starting in October 2010; WBEA AMS 11 – Lower Camp, located approximately 30km north of Fort McMurray, for the period December 2012 to March 2014; WBEA AMS 13 – Fort McKay South, located near Fort McKay, starting in June 2014. The TGM concentrations reported are comparable to those measured at sites across Canada (Cole et al., Atmosphere 2014, 5(3), 635-668).

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 9, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV HTML
Keywords:  Oil sands, Air quality, Ambient air, total gaseous mercury, CAPMoN, active sampling, oil sands, trace gases, Fort McKay
Federal

Total gaseous mercury (TGM) data are currently collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada at two Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Stations (AMS). Preliminary, hourly averaged TGM data from the oil sands region are available for: WBEA AMS 6 - Patricia McInnes, located in Fort McMurray, Alberta, and WBEA AMS 13 – Fort McKay South, located near Fort McKay, Alberta. There are no Environment and Climate Change Canada or Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) air quality guidelines, nor Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objectives, for TGM. The monitoring follows the established Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) standard operating procedures.

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 20, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, total gaseous mercury, CAPMoN, active sampling, oil sands, trace gases, Fort McKay, Fort McMurray, Oil sands
Federal

From August 10 to September 10, 2013, ground-based monitoring was significantly augmented at the Fort McKay South site (AMS13) to measure additional air pollutants and meteorological properties beyond what was available from the established long-term air quality monitoring in the area. This air monitoring study, undertaken in parallel with measurements from an aircraft flying over and downwind of the oil sands, was designed to gain a clearer picture of the mixture of air pollutants produced from different oil sands related activities and how they react and are transported in the atmosphere. These data are used to improve the capability of air quality models to determine current and future air pollutant levels and amounts of atmospheric deposition of pollutants over and downwind of the oil sands region. Periods of elevated pollutant concentrations were observed; however, none of these surpassed the current short duration (hourly, 8 hour or 24 hour) federal and provincial standards.

Last Updated: Feb. 21, 2019
Date Published: May 13, 2016
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Ambient air, ozone, total gaseous mercury, sulphur dioxide, particle composition, particulate matter (PM), PM composition, polycyclic aromatic compounds, oil sands
Federal

Measurements of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) and particulate bound mercury on PM2.5 (referred to as PBM) are currently collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada at a Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Station (AMS). Preliminary, three-hour averaged speciated mercury data from the oil sands region are available for WBEA AMS 13 – Fort McKay South, located near Fort McKay, Alberta. There are no Environment and Climate Change Canada or Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) air quality guidelines, nor Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objectives for speciated Hg measurements. The monitoring follows the established Canadian Air and Precipitation Monitoring Network (CAPMoN) standard operating procedures.

Last Updated: Feb. 23, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 20, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, speciated atmospheric mercury, particle composition, particulate matter, PM composition, CAPMoN, active sampling, oil sands, fine particulate matter
Federal

Ecosystem Sites, Volatile Organic Compounds – Preliminary Data, Oil Sands Region
Volatile organic compounds (VOC) data are currently collected by Environment and Climate Change Canada at a Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Station (AMS). As of September 27, 2017, raw, hourly averaged, near real-time VOC data from the oil sands region are available for WBEA AMS 25 – Waskow Ohci Pimatisiwin, located in Fort McKay, Alberta. Prior to this date, this instrument was measuring VOCs at WBEA AMS 1 – Bertha Ganter, also located in Fort McKay, Alberta. The VOCs that are currently being measured at AMS 25 are benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, m,p-xylenes, o-xylene, styrene, n-hexane, n-heptane, n-octane, 2-methylpentane, and methylcyclohexane.

Last Updated: Jul. 21, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 20, 2017
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Ambient air, active sampling, oil sands, volatile organic compounds, VOC, trace gases, Alberta Ambient Air Quality Objectives, Fort McKay, Oil sands
Federal

Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) has been monitoring trace metals in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) in the oil sands region since December 2010. Active PM2.5 sampling is collected at the Wood Buffalo Environmental Association (WBEA) Air Monitoring Stations: Mannix (AMS5), Lower Camp (AMS11) and Fort McKay South (AMS13; until March 2015), using the established protocols and schedule of the National Air Pollution Surveillance (NAPS) Program. In 2015, sampling began for PM2.5 and PM10-2.5 (coarse fraction) at the Fort McKay (AMS1), Wapasu (AMS17) and Stony Mountain (AMS18) sites. The data from the measurements conducted so far show that concentrations of metals decrease with distance from the main surface mining and upgrading activities, and that the crustal elements iron, silicon, aluminum, and calcium are present in greater abundance than other metals detected.

Last Updated: Jul. 24, 2019
Date Published: Apr. 1, 2014
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  deposition, particulate metals, active sampling, oil sands, fine particulate matter, PM2.5, modelling, air quality
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