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Found 10 records similar to Common nighthawk -Jasper

Federal

Common Nighthawk observations from incidental observations and mortality data reported in Kootenay National Park between 1981- 2017. Each observation is recorded by date, location and number of individuals observed.

Last Updated: Apr. 6, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Common Nighthawk, incidental observations
Federal

Black swift (Cypseloides niger) have been listed as an Endangered Species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In Jasper National Park, black swifts nest in canyon waterfalls and may be affected by decreases in water flow on account of decreased snow pack and glacial melt, and specific recreational activities that may disturb nesting birds. Data are collected by trained observers during the breeding season to identify breeding sites to inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Black swift, Cypseloides niger, Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada, COSEWIC
Federal

Bank swallows (Riparia riparia) and Barn swallows (Hirundo rustica) have been listed as Threatened species by the Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). In Jasper National Park, black swifts nest at variety of sites associated with vertical soil banks, including riverbanks and road cuts. Barn swallows nest at variety of sites associated with vegetation and artificial structures, including meadows and culverts. Data are collected by trained observers during the breeding season to identify breeding sites to inform management action.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, birds, Bank swallow, Riparia riparia, Barn swallow, Hirundo rustica
Federal

The number of common loons and their breeding range have decreased significantly since the beginning of the century. There is concern about the number of breeding pairs and the number of fledglings. In order to determine what the population status is throughout La Mauricie National Park, loons are monitored through two aerial surveys carried out over all the lakes in the park of more than three hectares as well as by canoe on the most accessible lakes in order to confirm the presence of loons and locate their nests.

Last Updated: Jun. 13, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Loons, Waterbirds, Common Loon, Population Cycle, Aerial Survey, Canoe, Mauricie
Federal

Forest birds are diverse in Ontario, with many species being common or very common on the Bruce Peninsula (i.e., American Redstart, Black-throated Green Warbler, Pileated Woodpecker. etc.). The national park monitors breeding forest birds (mostly songbirds and woodpeckers) with pre-programmed automated recorders at 20 sites (four routes), split equally between deciduous and coniferous forests.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Forest birds, warblers, woodpeckers, vireos, breeding, automated recorders, deciduous, coniferous, Great Lakes
Federal

Bat monitoring in Jasper National Park supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Survey efforts are increasingly important on account of the recent detection of white-nosed syndrome in western North America and evidence that the disease is spreading more readily. Data collected from hibernacula and maternity roost monitoring help determine species composition and relative abundance to inform management activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, bats, hibernacula, maternity roost, Chiroptera
Federal

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) restoration supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan. Whitebark Pine is an Endangered Species protected under the Species at Risk Act (SARA) and it has an important role as a keystone species across mountain landscapes. Seeds were collected from whitebark pines identified as being putatively resistant to blister rust and were germinated in nurseries for subsequent planting. Permanent transect plots for resistant seedlings and circular plots for resistant seeds were established to monitor survival after planting.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, Mount Robson Provincial Park, whitebark pine, blister rust, reforestation, restoration, Whitebark pine, inus albicaulis)
Federal

Bat monitoring in Jasper National Park supports Jasper National Park’s Multi-species Action Plan and it is part of the NABat continent-wide program to estimate population trends and distribution. Survey efforts are increasingly important on account of the recent detection of white-nosed syndrome in western North America and evidence that the disease is spreading more readily. The use of ultrasonic frequency recorders help determine species composition and relative abundance to inform management activities.

Last Updated: Apr. 12, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, bats, NABat, Chiroptera
Federal

Information regarding human-wildlife interactions in Jasper National Park is important to manage both human (eg. town residents, visitors) and wildlife needs (eg. area closures). Achieving this balance depends on data related, in part, on where animals have died or have been injured (eg highway, railway) and the many associated issues that impact wildlife behaviour (eg.

Last Updated: Jul. 26, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Jasper National Park, human-wildlife interactions, conflict, species
Federal

Field data from the monitoring of the common eider. The number of eggs and nests of the common eider were surveyed between 1988 and 2005. Many islands of the MANPRC are used by the common eider for nesting. The presence and great abundance of this species are characteristic of the inland ecology of the park.

Last Updated: Mar. 15, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Common eider, Somateria mollissima dresseri, abundance, nest, egg, Saint Lawrence River, forest, ecological integrity
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