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Found 10 records similar to Snowfall (Nunavut)

Federal

Nunavut’s cold climate makes it a territory consisting of mostly barren land and permafrost. Permafrost is soil or rocks whose temperature remains at or below the freezing point for a long period of time. Glaciers, a mass of snow and ice that does not melt from year to year prevail in the Innuitian Mountains. Permanent sea ice occurs in the northern part of the Arctic Ocean.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, permafrost
Federal

Ecozones are one of several levels of ecological regions that cover all of Canada. An ecozone is a discrete system, which has resulted from the mesh and interplay of geology, landform, soil, vegetation, climate, wildlife, water and human factors. Four of the fifteen terrestrial ecozones of Canada are found in Nunavut: Northern Arctic, Arctic Cordillera, Southern Arctic, and Taiga Shield.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, terrestrial ecosystems
Federal

The map shows the mean total precipitation in the month of January. January precipitation across Canada is mainly in the form of snow. Throughout much of the interior and the north, precipitation amounts are generally less than 20 mm and, in the high Arctic, as little as a few millimetres. The west coast receives heavy precipitation in the form of rain at low elevations and mainly snow at higher elevations.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, precipitation
Federal

This map shows the median date of snow-cover loss (defined as the last date with 14 consecutive days of snow cover greater than 2 centimetres in depth) computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). In areas with permanent or semipermanent snow cover (for example, Arctic ice caps) or in areas with irregular or ephemeral snow cover (coastal British Columbia), researchers were unable to compute the median values. The end date contours follow topography more closely than start date due to the influence of elevation on total snow accumulation and air temperature. The date of snow-cover loss has important implications for wildlife (for example, bird migration and nesting), vegetation, local climate and hydrology.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, snow
Federal

This map shows the median date of snow-cover onset (defined as the first date with 14 consecutive days of snow cover greater than 2 centimetres in depth) computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). In areas with permanent or semipermanent snow cover (for example, Arctic ice caps) or in areas with irregular or ephemeral snow cover (coastal British Columbia), researchers were unable to compute the median values. The main feature of the map is the rapid southward extension of snow cover over Canada during the September to December period. The moderating influence of Hudson Bay can be seen over northern Quebec, where snow cover starts later than in the equivalent latitudes west of Hudson Bay.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, snow
Federal

Canada may be divided into six broad Aboriginal cultural areas based on major geographic regions. Tribes in the same region share a greater number of cultural affinities than tribes from different regions. However only in the Arctic do the lines of geography, language and culture coincide so closely. Nunavut’s boundary strongly reflects that of the cultural zone of the Aboriginal people of the Eastern Arctic.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  aboriginal culture, demographic maps, map
Federal

This map shows the average maximum snow depth in centimetres computed over 18 winter seasons (1979 to 1997). Over southern Canada this usually occurs in January or February, while the time of maximum accumulation occurs much later in mountain areas and in the Arctic. The main features of the map are the pronounced maximum in snow accumulation over the western Cordillera, where snow depths can exceed several metres, with a secondary maximum over Quebec and Labrador. These maxima are related to their proximity to oceans, which act as sources of moisture and winter storms, and to the orographic effect of the mountains in the case of western Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, snow
Federal

A drainage basin is the area that drains all precipitation into a river or stream system into a common outlet such as a lake or sea. There are two main river basins in Nunavut: the Thelon River flows into Hudson Bay and the Back River empties into the Arctic Ocean. Most of Nunavut’s area is not drained through large rivers; instead the water flows directly to the ocean through small rivers and streams.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, watersheds
Federal

A geological province is an extensive region characterized by rocks and structures of varying types and ages. Canada has seventeen geological provinces consisting of a shield, platforms, orogens and continental shelves. Nunavut includes four of the geological provinces: Innuitian Orogen, Arctic Platform, Hudson Bay Lowlands, and Bear Province.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, geology, map
Federal

Contained within the 5th Edition (1978 to 1995) of the National Atlas of Canada is a plate with seven maps. The first map shows mean annual snowfall in Canada. Four additional maps show median snow depth for four separate months. The final two maps show snow cover and maximum snow depth.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Feb. 17, 1991
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  climate, meteorology, precipitation, snow, weather
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