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Found 10 records similar to Terrestrial Ecozones (Nunavut)

Federal

In Canada, there are 20 ecozones, consisting of 15 terrestrial and 5 marine units. The vegetation varies from one ecozone to another. Forests cover totally or partially nine ecozones: Pacific Maritime, Montane Cordillera, Boreal Cordillera, Taiga Plains, Boreal Plains, Prairie, Boreal Shield, Mixedwood Plains, and Atlantic Maritime.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  ecosystems, environment, forests, map
Federal

Ecozones are broad ecological zones on the earth's surface and cover a large range of ecosystems such as temperate forest, mountain ranges, grassland, taiga, arctic tundra, extensive river systems, coastline and farmlands. Each ecozone has its own climate, relief, soil, fauna and flora and distinct human activities. In Canada, there are 20 ecozones, consisting of 15 terrestrial and 5 marine units. Forests of Canada cover in total about nine ecozones.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, terrestrial ecosystems
Federal

Nunavut lies in the Arctic, where cold temperatures mean that snow can fall at anytime in the year. Typically the ground is snow covered from September until June. Most of Nunavut has a dry Arctic climate receiving less than 200 centimetres of snow annually.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, snow
Federal

Canada has defined a hierarchical classification of ecosystems. At a simple level there are 20 ecozones, fifteen terrestrial and five marine. An ecozone is an area of the earth’s surface that represents a large ecological zone and has characteristic landforms and climate. Each ecozone is distinguished from others by its unique mosaic of plants, wildlife, climate, landforms, and human activities.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, terrestrial ecosystems
Federal

This table contains 2286 series, with data for years 1971 - 2006 (not all combinations necessarily have data for all years). This table contains data described by the following dimensions (Not all combinations are available): Geography (127 items: All eco-regions with agricultural activity; Central Ungava Peninsula; Southern Arctic ecozone; Southern Arctic ecozone; Maguse River Upland; Southern Arctic ecozone ...), Agricultural activities (18 items: Total area; Number of farm units; Average farm unit size; Agricultural land area ...).

Last Updated: Oct. 28, 2021
Date Published: Apr. 22, 2014
Organization: Statistics Canada
Formats: XML CSV HTML
Keywords:  agriculture and food, environment, other content related to agriculture and food, table
Federal

Fifteen ecozones make up terrestrial Canada, and five make up the marine waters bordering Canada. Canada’s 15 terrestrial ecozones can be subdivided into 53 ecoprovinces, which can be further broken into 194 ecoregions. Ecozones are useful for general national reporting and for placing Canada’s ecosystem diversity in a North American or global context. Ecoprovinces are useful units at an intermediate scale for national and regional planning and reporting purposes.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  ecosystems, environment, map
Federal

The map shows the mean daily maximum temperatures for April. Below-freezing maximum temperatures in April are restricted to northern Canada and the extreme northern portions of Ontario and Quebec adjacent to Hudson Bay. Lengthening days and strengthening sunshine bring about a moderation in temperature in all parts of the country. In the high Arctic, maximum temperatures range from -15 to -30ºC, so winter is very much present despite the arrival of spring weather across southern Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, temperature
Federal

The map shows the mean total precipitation in the month of January. January precipitation across Canada is mainly in the form of snow. Throughout much of the interior and the north, precipitation amounts are generally less than 20 mm and, in the high Arctic, as little as a few millimetres. The west coast receives heavy precipitation in the form of rain at low elevations and mainly snow at higher elevations.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  environment, map, precipitation
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows drainage basins as well as major lakes and diversions. The map displays the ocean drainage areas along with component river basins and diversion areas for the Arctic, Pacific, Hudson Bay and Atlantic drainage areas.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 7, 1972
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  hydrography, inland waters, rivers, watersheds, waterways
Federal

The “Terrestrial Ecozones of Canada” dataset provides representations of ecozones. An ecozone is the top level of the four levels of ecosystems that the National Ecological Framework for Canada defines. The framework divides Canada into 15 terrestrial ecozones that define its ecological mosaic on a sub-continental scale. Ecozones represent an area of the earth’s surface as large and very generalized ecological units.

Last Updated: Jul. 27, 2021
Date Published: May 21, 2013
Organization: Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Formats: PDF FGDB/GDB HTML ESRI REST GML
Keywords:  Terrestrial ecosystems, Ecology, Ecosystems
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