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Found 10 records similar to Aboriginal Cultural Areas (Nunavut)

Federal

Outstanding rivers of natural, cultural historical, and recreational values are insured long-term management and conservation by the Canada Heritage Rivers System (CHRS). Three of Canada’s 28 Heritage Rivers flow in Nunavut: the Thelon, Kazan, and Soper rivers. These rivers reflect the physical and cultural heritage of Nunavut.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, rivers
Federal

This map shows the distribution of the 41 000 persons identifying themselves as Inuit in the 1996 Census. Inuit are the Aboriginal people of Arctic Canada. The word « Inuit » means « the people » in Inuktitut, the Inuit language, and is the term by which Inuit refer to themselves. The Inuit population is almost entirely situated north of the 50th parallel.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, inuit, map, population
Federal

Nunavut lies in the Arctic, where cold temperatures mean that snow can fall at anytime in the year. Typically the ground is snow covered from September until June. Most of Nunavut has a dry Arctic climate receiving less than 200 centimetres of snow annually.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, snow
Federal

A drainage basin is the area that drains all precipitation into a river or stream system into a common outlet such as a lake or sea. There are two main river basins in Nunavut: the Thelon River flows into Hudson Bay and the Back River empties into the Arctic Ocean. Most of Nunavut’s area is not drained through large rivers; instead the water flows directly to the ocean through small rivers and streams.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, watersheds
Federal

In Nunavut, aircrafts are the ideal form of transportation for people because of the enormous distances between communities and vast areas of permafrost. Air transportation has developed rapidly, and now all communities are served on a daily basis. This contributes to Nunavut’s economy because it allows for faster and easier access within the territory and to the southern regions.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  air transport, demographic maps, map
Federal

Nunavut’s cold climate makes it a territory consisting of mostly barren land and permafrost. Permafrost is soil or rocks whose temperature remains at or below the freezing point for a long period of time. Glaciers, a mass of snow and ice that does not melt from year to year prevail in the Innuitian Mountains. Permanent sea ice occurs in the northern part of the Arctic Ocean.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, permafrost
Federal

Ecozones are one of several levels of ecological regions that cover all of Canada. An ecozone is a discrete system, which has resulted from the mesh and interplay of geology, landform, soil, vegetation, climate, wildlife, water and human factors. Four of the fifteen terrestrial ecozones of Canada are found in Nunavut: Northern Arctic, Arctic Cordillera, Southern Arctic, and Taiga Shield.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, map, terrestrial ecosystems
Federal

World Heritage Sites represent exceptional natural and cultural areas recognized internationally by the World Heritage Convention of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO). This map locates the World Heritage sites in Canada.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, historic sites, map, tourism
Federal

National Historic Sites and their associated artefacts are preserved to promote an appreciation of historic places, people, and events and their contribution to the Canadian identity. There are eleven national historic sites in Nunavut. The first designated historic sites in Nunavut recognized European activities. More recently, the national historic sites have been designated to recognize sites important in aboriginal history.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, historic sites, map
Federal

Nunavut’s 26 000 inhabitants live in 28 communities widely scattered across 2 million square kilometres. All communities are accessible by air and by sea. The Inuit have occupied the region for thousands of years and form almost 85 percent of the current population. Their language, Inuktitut is spoken by 80 per cent of the population.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  demographic maps, inuit, map
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