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Found 10 records similar to A substrate classification for the Inshore Scotian Shelf and Bay of Fundy, Maritimes Region

Federal

This deep water substrate bottom type model was created to aid in habitat modeling, and to complement the nearshore bottom patches. It was created from a combination of bathymetrically-derived layers in addition to bottom type observations. Using random forest classification, the relationship between observed substrates and bathymetric derivatives was estimated across the entire area of interest.

The raster is categorized into: 1) Rock, 2) Mixed, 3) Sand, 4) Mud

Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: Sep. 17, 2018
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: TIFF CSV ESRI REST PDF
Keywords:  Rugosity, Seabed, Sea bed, Substrate, Ocean floor, Sediments
Federal

The excessive input of nitrogen derived from human land-use activities remains a major cause of the eutrophication of coastal ecosystems around the world. However, little data exist on rates of nutrient pollution or its potential impacts to coastal ecosystems in Atlantic Canada. To fill this knowledge gap, a Nitrogen Loading Model (NLM) framework was applied to determine the Total Nitrogen Load (kg TN / yr) from point and non-point source inputs (wastewater, atmospheric deposition, land use, fertilizer applications, and regional industries) in 109 coastal watersheds bordering the Bay of Fundy and Scotian Shelf. To evaluate the potential impact of nitrogen loading, two indicators were calculated for 40 coastal embayments: (1) ∆N, a measure of nitrogen residency that predicts dissolved oxygen problems; and (2) the estuary loading rate, a predictor of the potential for loss of submerged aquatic vegetation.

Last Updated: Aug. 25, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 5, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: FGDB/GDB CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

The shallow substrate bottom type model was created to support near shore habitat modelling. Data sources include both available observations of bottom type and environmental predictor layers including oceanographic layers, fetch, and bathymetry and its derivatives. Using weighted random forest classification from the ranger R package, the relationship between observed bottom type and predictor layers can be determined, allowing bottom type to be classified across the study areas. The predicted raster files are classified as follows: 1) Rock, 2) Mixed, 3) Sand, 4) Mud

The categorical substrate model domains are restricted to the extent of the input bathymetry layers (see data sources) which is 5 km from the 50 m depth contour.

Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 31, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: TIFF CSV ESRI REST PDF
Keywords:  Ocean bottom, Sea bed, Seabed, Rugosity, Sediments, Ocean floor
Federal

In 2016-17, DFO Maritimes Region undertook a Marine Protected Area (MPA) network analysis for the Scotian Shelf-Bay of Fundy Bioregion. The analysis considered available bioregional-scale ecological and human use data in an effort to identify a draft MPA network design that would protect biodiversity while minimizing any potential impacts on commercial fishing and other industries. The data layers used for the offshore component of the MPA network analysis are provided here. These layers are not presented in their original forms and were modified (e.g.

Last Updated: Aug. 25, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 12, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

The Scotian Shelf population of northern bottlenose whales (Hyperoodon ampullatus) is listed as Endangered under Canada’s Species at Risk Act. Partial critical habitat was identified for this population in the Recovery Strategy first published in 2010 (Fisheries and Oceans Canada 2016), and three critical habitat areas were designated along the eastern Scotian Shelf, encompassing the Gully, Shortland Canyon, and Haldimand Canyon (shapefile available online: https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/db177a8c-5d7d-49eb-8290-31e6a45d786c). However, the Recovery Strategy recognized that additional areas may constitute critical habitat for the population and recommended further studies based on acoustic and visual monitoring to assess the importance of inter-canyon areas as foraging habitat and transit corridors for northern bottlenose whales. In a subsequent study of the distribution, movements, and habitat use of northern bottlenose whales on the eastern Scotian Shelf (Stanistreet et al.

Last Updated: Aug. 25, 2022
Date Published: May 7, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

Data from the analysis of sea surface temperature, sea surface salinity, bottom temperature, and bottom salinity, over the Gulf of Maine and Scotian Shelf, for 23 CMIP6 models. The analysis includes an evaluation of CMIP6 model performance for the CMIP6 historical (1950-2014) experiment. Future projections are summarized for CMIP6 scenarios SSP245 and SSP370 with the calculation of relative annual and seasonal changes between the historical period (1950-2014) and three future periods (2030-2039, 2040-2049, 2030-2049). Wang, Z., DeTracey, B., Maniar, A., Greenan, B., Gilbert, D. and Brickman, D., Future hydrographic state of the Scotian Shelf and Gulf of Maine from 23 CMIP6 models.

Last Updated: Aug. 9, 2022
Date Published: Jul. 5, 2022
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: XLSX FGDB/GDB CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

Fisheries landings and effort mapping of the inshore lobster fishery on the DFO Maritimes Region statistical grid (2012-2014). This report describes an analysis of Maritimes Region inshore lobster logbook data reported at a grid level, including Bay of Fundy Grey Zone data reported at the coordinate level. Annual and composite (2012–2014) grid maps were produced for landings, number of license-days fished, number of trap hauls, and the same series standardized by grid area, as well as maps of catch weight per number of trap hauls as an index of catch per unit effort (CPUE). Spatial differences in fishing pressure, landings, and CPUE are indicated, and potential mapping applications are outlined.

Last Updated: Jan. 15, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 1, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Fish, Fisheries, Biomass, Fishing area
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Nov. 4, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 17, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Scotian Shelf Biogeographic Zone, Scotian Shelf, Sponge Grounds, Sponge, Porifera, Western II A, Marine biology
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Sep. 25, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 17, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Scotian Shelf Biogeographic Zone, Scotian Shelf, Sea Pen Field, Sea Pen, Pennatulacea, Western II A, Marine biology
Federal

Polygons denoting concentrations of sea pens, small and large gorgonian corals and sponges on the east coast of Canada have been identified through spatial analysis of research vessel survey by-catch data following an approach used by the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization (NAFO) in the Regulatory Area (NRA) on Flemish Cap and southeast Grand Banks. Kernel density analysis was used to identify high concentrations and the area occupied by successive catch weight thresholds was used to identify aggregations. These analyses were performed for each of the five biogeographic zones of eastern Canada. The largest sea pen fields were found in the Laurentian Channel as it cuts through the Gulf of St. Lawrence, while large gorgonian coral forests were found in the Eastern Arctic and on the northern Labrador continental slope.

Last Updated: Sep. 16, 2019
Date Published: Oct. 17, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: ESRI REST
Keywords:  Scotian Shelf Biogeographic Zone, Scotian Shelf, Large Gorgonian Field, Large Gorgonian, Western IIA, Marine biology
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