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Found 10 records similar to Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality: Guideline Technical Document – Ammonia

Federal

It is not considered necessary to establish a maximum acceptable concentration for chloramines in drinking water, based on the low toxicity of monochloramine at concentrations found in drinking water. Any measures taken to limit the concentration of chloramines or their by-products in drinking water supplies must not compromise the effectiveness of disinfection.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chloramines, chloramines in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

There is no consistent, convincing evidence that ingested asbestos is hazardous. There is, therefore, no need to establish a maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for asbestos in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, asbestos, asbestos in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

The maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) for chlorite in drinking water is 1 mg/L. The MAC for chlorate in drinking water is 1 mg/L. A guideline for chlorine dioxide is not required because of its rapid reduction to chlorite in drinking water. Utilities should make every effort to meet the guidelines, however, any method of control employed must not compromise the effectiveness of water disinfection.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 22, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chlorite, chlorite in drinking-water, chlorate, chlorate in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

There is no evidence of adverse health effects specifically attributable to calcium in drinking water. Insufficient data are available to set a specific value for an aesthetic objective for calcium in drinking water. A guideline for calcium has therefore not been specified.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Nov. 28, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, calcium, calcium in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Bromate is usually found in drinking water as a result of water treatment, rather than through source water contamination. The presence of bromate in treated drinking water is primarily related to the reaction between ozone and naturally occurring bromide in source water and to its formation during the generation of hypochlorite solutions used to disinfect water. This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with bromate in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 3, 2018
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, bromate, bromate in drinking-water, health risks
Federal

An aesthetic objective of ≤250 mg/L has been established for chloride in drinking water. At concentrations above the aesthetic objective, chloride imparts undesirable tastes to water and to beverages prepared from water and may cause corrosion in the distribution system.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 4, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, chloride, chloride in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Although benzene is naturally occurring at low concentrations, its presence in the environment is mostly related to human activities. Gasoline contains low concentrations of benzene (below 1%), and emissions from vehicles are the main source of benzene in the environment. Benzene can be introduced into water by industrial effluents and atmospheric pollution. This Guideline Technical Document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with benzene in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 29, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 23, 2017
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, benzene, benzene in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Turbidity is a measure of the relative clarity or cloudiness of water. It is not a direct measure of suspended particles, but rather a general measure of the scattering and absorbing effect that suspended particles have on light. This Guideline Technical Document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with turbidity in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, turbidity, turbidity in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Chromium occurs naturally in small amounts in rocks and soils, some of which is released into the aquatic environment through weathering and erosion processes. This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with chromium in drinking water. It incorporates new studies and approaches and takes into consideration the availability of appropriate treatment technology. A maximum acceptable concentration (MAC) of 0.05 mg/L (50 µg/L) is established for total chromium in drinking water.

Last Updated: Dec. 1, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, Chromium, water containing Chromium, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
Federal

Lead is usually found in drinking water as a result of leaching from distribution and plumbing system components, particularly in aggressive (corrosive) waters. Historically, lead has been used extensively in service lines, solders and fittings, making its presence in drinking water more likely in older homes and neighbourhoods. This guideline technical document reviews and assesses all identified health risks associated with lead in drinking water.

Last Updated: Nov. 30, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2016
Organization: Health Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Canadian drinking-water quality, technical document, lead, lead in drinking-water, maximum acceptable concentration, health risks
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