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Found 10 records similar to Traplines of British Columbia

Provincial

The Registered Fur Management Area dataset is comprised of all the polygons that represent the Registered Fur Management Areas in Alberta. A Registered Fur Management Area (RFMA) is a parcel of public land the boundary of which is described on the Registered Fur Management Licence. A Registered Fur Management Licence permits the licence holder to hunt and trap fur-bearing animals on the lands described on the licence.

Last Updated: Sep. 12, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 28, 2018
Organization: Government of Alberta
Formats: XML HTML
Keywords:  BOUNDARIES, FUR-MANAGEMENT-AREA, FUR-MANAGEMENT-AREAS, FUR-TRAPPING-AREA, FUR-TRAPPING-AREAS, REGISTERED-FUR-MANAGEMENT-AREA, REGISTERED-FUR-MANAGEMENT-AREAS, TRAPPER-AREA, TRAPPER-AREAS
Provincial

Existing and Cancelled Trapline Cabin Sites within the Kootenay Region (qtrpcbr4).

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Mar. 9, 2011
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Kootenay Region, Nelson, trapline, Government information
Federal

Contained within the 3rd Edition (1957) of the Atlas of Canada is a map that shows 14 condensed maps including large scale selected areas, and smaller scaled maps of Canada. The six maps in the top left portion of this plate illustrate the number of pelts taken in the 1950/1951 furring season by province and territory for the following animals: wild beaver, wild and ranch raised mink, wild ermine, wild muskrat, wild and ranch raised fox, and wild squirrel. An additional summary map shows the pelts taken for all fur bearing animals in the 1950/1951 furring season. The map in the bottom left portion of this plate shows the distribution of fur farms, and the distribution of fur trading establishments.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 1, 1957
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  animal husbandry, fisheries management, fisheries products, furs, hunting - sport, sealing, seals, whales, whaling
Federal

Contained within the 4th Edition (1974) of the Atlas of Canada is a collection consisting of a map showing location, extent and number of fur farms for 1967 as well as several graphs and 12 small scale maps showing the ranges of: beaver, barren ground caribou, mule deer, muskrat, woodland caribou, white tailed deer, mink, polar bear, mountain sheep, red fox / arctic fox, black bear / grisly bear and mountain goat / musk ox. The first graph shows the number, value and origin of raw furs for the 1966 to 1967 furring season as well as the territorial origin of leading fur types as a percentage of the national value by province and territory. The remaining graphs show, for the period between the 1924 to 1925 and 1966 to 1967 furring seasons, the seasonal values of raw furs, the average price per pelt for selected kinds and the value of export and import of raw furs.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Jan. 13, 1971
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: PDF JPG
Keywords:  animal husbandry, farms, furs
Federal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada and Environment and Climate Change Canada (Northern Contaminants program) have been working with Nunavut community Hunters and Trappers Organizations and theNunavut Wildlife Management Board consistently since 1980 to collect samples from harvested ringed seals. The majority of seals were measured in the field by Inuit hunters who recorded date of kill, sex and blubber depth at sternum (0.5 cm). The data from the harvested animals are used to evaluate stressors and overall seal health, in the Canadian Arctic.

Last Updated: Sep. 14, 2020
Date Published: Jul. 1, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Marine Habitat, Arctic Ocean, Baffin Bay, Canadian Basin, Hudson Bay and James Bay, Hudson Strait and Ungava Bay, Fisheries resources, Mammals, Marine biology
Federal

Waterfowl and mammals harvested and trapped at various locations in the oil sands region and in reference locations are assessed for contaminant burdens and toxicology. Wildlife samples are obtained from local hunters and trappers. Tissue samples are analysed for concentrations of oil sands-related contaminants (heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and naphthenic acids). Dead and moribund birds collected from tailing ponds are also evaluated for levels and effects of contaminants.

Last Updated: May 20, 2022
Date Published: Oct. 4, 2013
Organization: Environment and Climate Change Canada
Formats: WMS CSV HTML ESRI REST
Keywords:  oil sands; monitoring; biodiversity; contaminants; waterfowl; mammals, Nature and Biodiversity - Contaminants, Observation/Measurement, Protect Species Well-Being, Assess Status of Species, Prairie - Alberta (AB), Oil sands, Game (Wildlife)
Federal

This project aims to capture population trends by estimating absolute abundance of American Black Bears (Ursus americanus) every 2-3 years and relative abundance of three forest mammals (American Black Bear, Grey Wolf (Canis lupus) and Black-tailed Deer (Odocoileus hemionus ssp.)) annually. Forty two 6.8 km2 grid cell units on the landscape are surveyed for animal presence three times per season between May and September using remote wildlife cameras. Cameras are cycled through the 42 sites over the course of the sampling season with each survey lasting ca.

Last Updated: Apr. 17, 2018
Date Published: Oct. 1, 2017
Organization: Parks Canada
Formats: CSV
Keywords:  Pacific Rim NPR, American Black Bear (Ursus americanus), Grey Wolf (Canis lupus), Black-tailed Deer (Odocoileus hemionus), Abundance, Occupancy, Remote Cameras
Federal

National Wildlife Areas conserve essential wildlife habitats. There are two National Wildlife Areas in Nunavut: Nirjutiqavvik and Polar Bear Pass. While most human activities are prohibited, permits can be issued for activities that are compatible with conservation.

Last Updated: Mar. 14, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 31, 2010
Organization: Natural Resources Canada
Formats: JP2 other ZIP
Keywords:  conservation areas, demographic maps, map
Provincial

Boundaries identifying similar behavioural ecotypes and sub-populations of Grizzly bears. This dataset contains versions from multiple years. From 2018 on, NatureServe conservation concern ranking categories (e.g., Very Low, Low, Moderate, High, Extreme Concern) supersede the pre-2018 population status categories (e.g., Viable, Threatened, Extirpated) contained in the field STATUS. NatureServe conservation concern ranking categories reflect population size and trend, genetic and demographic isolation, as well as threats to bears and their habitats.

Last Updated: Dec. 10, 2020
Date Published: Jan. 21, 2013
Organization: Government of British Columbia
Formats: KML PDF HTML WMS
Keywords:  GBPU, Grizzly Bear, Grizzly Bear Population Unit, Population, bear, grizzly, unit, Government information
Provincial

Registered Trapping Concessions (RTCs) are legal boundaries that define an area where the holder of the concession has the exclusive right to trap furbearing animals. Because trapping is done primarily along waterways, RTCs are often defined by watersheds, using height of land (ridges and mountain peaks) as their boundaries. This is the opposite of GMAs which are defined by mountains. Sometimes RTCs are grouped together to form a Group Trapping Concession (in which groups of individual share the right to trap).

Last Updated: Mar. 29, 2022
Date Published: Aug. 27, 2019
Organization: Government of Yukon
Formats: XML HTML other
Keywords:  Y.T., Yukon Territory, Yukon, Canada, harvest, trapper, fur, trapping, furbearer
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