Open Government Portal

Found 333 records

Federal

To directly access the CHS NONNA Data Portal please follow this link - https://data.chs-shc.ca/login (Note - The portal is NOT compatible with Internet Explorer browser). New users of the CHS NONNA Data Portal are encouraged to fully review the 'CHS NONNA Data Portal Guidance Document' (PDF) which is available below in the RESOURCES section of this page. ----- PRODUCT USE -----

The Canadian Hydrographic Service (CHS) NONNA Bathymetric Data products are for NON-NAVIGATIONAL USE ONLY. Under the Navigation Safety Regulations, 2020, made pursuant to the Canada Shipping Act (2001), notwithstanding exceptions, vessels navigating in Canadian waters must carry and use nautical charts and related publications issued by, or on the authority of the CHS.

Last Updated: Jan. 18, 2021
Date Published: Oct. 11, 2018
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: WMS PDF WCS HTML
Keywords:  Bathymetry, Depth, Hydrography
Federal

An annual trawl survey is conducted in Southwestern Nova Scotia and the Bay of Fundy to assess the lobster stocks in the area. The survey is conducted with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center Ecosystem Survey Trawl (NEST), a small mesh trawl with a cod end liner, which ensures the capture of various sizes of lobster. The dimensions and location of the trawl are monitored and recorded throughout the tow using an electronic trawl mensuration system. In addition, water temperature and depth are also monitored.

Last Updated: Jan. 18, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 13, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV ESRI REST
Keywords:  Oceans
Federal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada requires operators of active marine finfish aquaculture sites in British Columbia to monitor for benthic (seabed) impacts. The benthic monitoring program is designed to limit the location, area and intensity of impact created by fish farms to the seabed and to support sustainable aquaculture by maintaining healthy ecosystems. All operational sites must be monitored at peak production, when the greatest environmental impact is most likely to occur. If the thresholds outlined in Aquaculture Activities Regulations are exceeded, the site must be fallowed (left empty) until further monitoring shows the seabed has sufficiently recovered.

Last Updated: Jan. 15, 2021
Date Published: May 18, 2017
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific region, Aquaculture, fish farming, organic waste, waste, benthic, British Columbia, BC
Federal

These datasets show commercial fisheries catch weight landings of directed fisheries and bycatch from the Scotian Shelf, the Bay of Fundy, and Georges Bank from NAFO Divisions 4VWX and the Canadian portions of 5Y and 5Z. Atlantic Canadian inter-regional maps of four species (Atlantic Halibut, Bluefin Tuna, Redfish and Scallop) are also included from NAFO Divisions 4RST, 3KLMNOP, and 2GHJ. Five-year composite maps (2014–2018) that aggregate catches for each map series are publicly available. The maps aggregate catch weight (kg) per 10 km2 hexagon grid cell for selected species, species groupings and gear types to identify important fishing areas.

Last Updated: Jan. 15, 2021
Date Published: Aug. 1, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: FGDB/GDB PDF MXD CSV KMZ ESRI REST
Keywords:  Maritimes, Fishing Atlas, Commercial Fisheries, Fishing area, Fisheries management, Fish, Fisheries
Federal

Mortality at salmon aquaculture facilities is closely monitored. If the amount of dead fish at a farm exceeds thresholds outlined in conditions of licence, a mortality event is said to have occurred and must be reported to DFO within 24 hours of discovery. Facility managers and veterinarian(s) must determine the probable cause of the event and develop a plan to mitigate ongoing harm to the farmed fish and reduce any risk to wild fish. Companies must continue to update Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) every 10 days for the duration of the mortality event, including daily mortality counts, mitigation applied, determination of the cause(s) of the event and any updated plan.

Last Updated: Jan. 11, 2021
Date Published: Mar. 12, 2019
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: XLSX CSV
Keywords:  Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific region, Aquaculture, fish farming, salmon farming, fish health monitoring, fish health events, British Columbia, BC
Federal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada’s (DFO’s) Pacific Aquaculture Regulations and Conditions of Licence for aquaculture in B.C. require licence holders to take various fish escape prevention measures, including maintaining cage and nets in a manner to prevent the escape of farmed fish into the ocean as well as responding to remedy the cause of the escape as soon as possible. When there is evidence that an escape event has occurred, licence holders must report the incident to the department within 24 hours either through the Observe Record and Report Line (ORR 1-800-465-4336), or to a dedicated email mailbox, detailing the cause, time and location of the event and the species, size and number of fish involved. The licence holder must also provide fish health information about the stock, such as exposure to therapeutants.

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jul. 22, 2016
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: CSV TXT
Keywords:  Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific region, Aquaculture, licence, fish farming, salmon farming, aquaculture escapes, British Columbia, BC
Federal

Phytoplankton pigments, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) have been measured on DFO La Perouse cruises since 2011. Surface samples are taken along a series of transects off the west coast of Vancouver Island twice a year usually in May/June and early September.

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 7, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Biological oceanography, Phytoplankton, Microalgae, Plankton, Aquatic ecosystems
Federal

Phytoplankton pigments, determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are measured on DFO cruises three times a year in February, June, and August/September along Line P in the northeast subarctic Pacific. Sampling for phytoplankton pigments started in 2006 at the five main Line P stations and was expanded to sample at all twenty seven stations along the transect in June 2010.

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 7, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: HTML ESRI REST CSV
Keywords:  Biological oceanography, Phytoplankton, Microalgae, Plankton, Aquatic ecosystems
Federal

Changes in phytoplankton abundance and community composition have the potential to impact the entire food web and alter ecosystem productivity and biogeochemical cycles. Recognizing its importance, Fisheries and Oceans Canada (DFO) established a phytoplankton monitoring program on the Pacific coast of Canada based on phytoplankton pigment measurements.

Phytoplankton pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids) and ancillary data are collected annually on DFO cruises at multiple locations in waters of the northeast subarctic Pacific and the west coast of Canada. Water samples are collected at discrete depths in the upper layer and analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC).

Last Updated: Jan. 7, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 7, 2021
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Biological oceanography, Phytoplankton, Microalgae, Plankton, Aquatic ecosystems
Federal

Seasonal temperature climatology of the Northeast Pacific Ocean was computed from historical observations including all available conductivity-temperature-depth (CTD), bottle, expendable bathy-thermograph (XBT), and Argo data in NOAA (http://www.argo.ucsd.edu/), Marine Environmental Data Service (MEDS), and Institute of Ocean Sciences archives over 1980 to 2010 period. Calculations, including smooth and interpolation, were carried out in sixty-five subregions and up to fifty-two vertical levels from surface to 5000m. Seasonal averages were computed as the median of yearly seasonal values. Spring months were defined as April to June, summer months were defined as July to September, fall months were defined as October to December, and winter months were defined as January to March.

Last Updated: Jan. 6, 2021
Date Published: Jan. 1, 2020
Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada
Formats: PDF FGDB/GDB ESRI REST
Keywords:  Climatology, Temperature, Oceans
Date modified: