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Federal

Fisheries and Oceans Canada is responsible for licensing all aquaculture facilities in British Columbia. The aquaculture licence and conditions of licence are designed to ensure the sustainable operation and development of the aquaculture industry. The following lists contain details related to currently licensed aquaculture facilities in British Columbia.

Organization: Fisheries and Oceans Canada

Formats: XLSX CSV XLS

Key Words:  Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific region, Aquaculture, fish farming, aquaculture licensing,

Federal

Birds adapted to alpine ecosystems are often sensitive to habitat and climate changes because of their niche specialization. For example, birds that are specialized to breeding in colder alpine conditions may be outcompeted by more generalist species if warmer conditions arise. Yearly data are collected at these sites using audio recorders to determine indices of bird diversity and occupancy trends to inform management.

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  Kootenay National Park, birds, alpine ecosystem,

Federal

River otters (Lontra canadensis) are semi-aquatic mammalian predators closely associated to freshwater resources but also linked to terrestrial habitat features, at the aquatic-terrestrial interface of riparian zones. This species is an indicator of freshwater ecosystem conditions as healthy tributaries should be able to sustain populations of this resident top-level predator with two main ecological requirements: the availability of food and shelter opportunities. The purpose of the river otter monitoring program at Kouchibouguac National Park is to determine the total number of distinct groups as an indication of population status. The sampling methods for this measure involve an annual census in winter, usually between the end of January to early March, where transects are conducted on the entire lengths of the main watercourses from the estuaries to the Park’s border.

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  river otter, Lontra canadensis, semi-aquatic, mammal, predator, indicator species, trophic level, riparian zones, tributaries, freshwater ecosystems, activity sites, tracks, water access holes, refuges, slides, faeces, latrines, burrows, shelters, groups, population dynamics, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

Federal

The Canadian Council of Ministers of the Environment (CCME) has designed a Water Quality Index (WQI) to translate complex water quality data into an overall integrated score from 0-100. This score is based on the number of measured variables, which have observations exceeding water quality thresholds (i.e., scope); the number of these exceedances in the dataset (i.e., frequency); and the magnitude by which the observations exceed the guidelines (i.e., amplitude). These water quality parameters are crucial indicators of the physical, chemical or biological conditions in aquatic systems and processes. The purpose of the water quality monitoring program at Kouchibouguac National Park is to use this index to calculate a score and evaluate the status of our freshwater ecosystems.

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  Water Quality Index, WQI, score, thresholds, tributaries, rivers, streams, freshwater ecosystems, water quality, nutrients, dissolved metals, water chemistry, anthropogenic disturbance, aquatic pollution, key variables, deforestation, agriculture, urbanization, acidification, eutrophication, aquatic processes, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

Federal

The influence of water temperature on the ecology of aquatic organisms with optimal thermal ranges is quite substantial, as these regimes regulate activity, growth, survival, and spawning behaviour. In consequence, a deviation from normal temperature ranges often cause displacement, disease, or even mortality therefore water temperature constitutes an important limiting factor for the condition of fish habitat and freshwater ecosystems. The purpose of the fish thermal stress monitoring program at Kouchibouguac National Park is to determine the number of consecutive “hot” days within a particular time period and detect changes in the level of thermal stress imposed on fish due to warm temperatures. Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) was selected as a focus species due to its lowest thermal tolerance compared to several other fish groups.

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, focus species, water temperature, thermal stress, optimal temperature, temperature range, regime, activity, growth, survival, spawning behaviour, streams, rivers, tributaries, freshwater ecosystems, bioenergetics, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

Federal

The Canadian Aquatic Biomonitoring Network (CABIN) is a national aquatic biomonitoring program, established and maintained by Environment and Climate Change Canada, to provide a standardized protocol for the ecological assessment of freshwater ecosystems with the use of benthic macroinvertebrate communities as biological indicators for stream or river conditions. The purpose of the benthic invertebrates monitoring program at Kouchibouguac National Park is to assess the status of freshwater benthic invertebrate assemblages over time and detect trends in order to provide an early warning of deterioration through reductions in total taxa richness, EPT index (i.e., pollution-sensitive taxa richness), or an increase in the Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI) for organic pollution. All field and laboratory procedures follow standard CABIN protocols. A total of 13 sites are monitored; 6 located within KNP boundaries and are sampled annually (PRT01, FNT01, PLY01, BLK01, RNK01, MKL01); while 7 sites are located outside KNP but within the zone of influence and cooperation; 3 of which are also sampled annually (KCC03, KCS03, RTB01-02) while the remaining 4 are sampled in alternate years (KCC01, KCC02, KCS01, KCS02).

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  CABIN, biomonitoring, benthic invertebrates, biological indicators, community structure, biodiversity, water quality, taxa richness, EPT Index, Hilsenhoff Biotic Index, HBI, aquatic pollution, anthropogenic disturbance, wadeable streams, rivers, freshwater ecosystems, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

Federal

The Acadian forest in a natural state is one of the richest and more diverse temperate forests in the World, however it has been listed as one of six endangered forests in North America and is also the predominant ecosystem within Kouchibouguac National Park. A few key tree species of priority conservation concern have been identified as indicators of forests conditions: white pine (Pinus strobus), eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), and eastern white cedar (Thuya occidentalis). These softwood species merit particular attention due to their rarity relative to historic levels or recent notable declines at the population level. Red maple (Acer rubrum) has also been selected for special interest as a representative of hardwood species in mixed forests.

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  Acadian forest, white pine, Pinus strobus, eastern hemlock, Tsuga canadensis, red maple, Acer rubrum, eastern white cedar, Thuya occidentalis, forest permanent sampling plot, PSP, forest ecosystems, forest dynamics, hardwood species, softwood species, key tree species, indicator species, succession stage, crown condition, mortality, regeneration, recruitment subplots, Forest Succession Index, FSI, diameter breast height, DBH, seedlings, saplings, height classes, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

Federal

Peatlands are valuable ecosystems due to their critical ecological functions, however these sensitive habitats are vulnerable to various anthropogenic (e.g., peat-moss extraction, forestry or land-use practices, hydrological modifications, fragmentation, infrastructures); atmospheric (e.g., acid rain, nitrogen deposition, climate change); and natural (e.g., fire, erosion, invasive vegetation) stressors. The purpose of the bog dynamics monitoring program is to evaluate the condition of several ombrotrophic bogs with water quantity and quality parameters, as well as modifications in vegetation composition in order to detect degradation of these systems over time due to the potential stressors. The methods for this measure involve the monitoring of six stations, each consisting of three vegetation plots placed at set points along a transect located in representative vegetation away from the moat zone; and one surface water well for the measurement of water quantity and quality parameters. Each permanent vegetation plot consists of one shrub quadrat (5m x 5m) and four ground vegetation quadrats (1m x 1m).

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  peatlands, wetland ecosystems, bogs, ombrotrophic, anthropogenic disturbance, atmospheric disturbance, natural disturbance, stressors, water quantity, water quality, permanent vegetation plot, vegetation composition, shrubs, forbs, mosses, graminoids, lichens, nutrients, community dynamics, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

Federal

Plethodontid salamanders are ‘early warning’ indicators of biodiversity and forest conditions due to the high densities of populations in addition to the keystone role of this species in ecosystem processes as well as in food web dynamics. The purpose of the salamanders monitoring program at Kouchibouguac National Park is to count the number of eastern red-backed salamanders (Plethodon cinereus) at several sites in order to detect changes over time as an indication of population status. The methods for this measure involve the monitoring of 28 sites established around the perimeter of permanent sampling plots (PSPs) within four dominant forest stands (i.e., white pine, eastern hemlock, red maple, eastern white cedar). At each site, 40 simple non-layered artificial cover objects (ACOs) are checked annually in the fall from mid-September to mid-November, atleast four times and two weeks apart to minimize disturbance.

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  eastern red-backed salamander, Plethodon cinereus, salamander, amphibian, indicator species, artificial cover object, ACO, disturbance, forest ecosystems, forest permanent sampling plot, PSP, ecosystem processes, population dynamics, food web dynamics, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

Federal

The piping plover (Charadrius melodus) is a small endangered shorebird listed under the federal Species at Risk Act (SARA). This species uses ocean shorelines as breeding grounds and nests in soft sandy areas with sparse vegetation above the high tide water line. These birds are indicators for the condition of coastal ecosystems due to their critical status; but also since this species is susceptible to human disturbance, habitat loss or alterations, predation, and sensitive to inclement weather related to sea level rise or climate change. The extensive barrier islands within Kouchibouguac National Park host a considerable percentage of the population along the Atlantic Coast therefore our role is crucial in the outcome of this species on a continental scale.

Organization: Parks Canada

Formats: CSV

Key Words:  piping plover, Charadrius melodus, species at risk, endangered, shorebird, indicator species, coastal ecosystems, sand dunes, barrier islands, productivity, fledglings, hatchlings, nesting pairs, breeding success, population dynamics, anthropogenic disturbance, inclement weather, Kouchibouguac National Park, New Brunswick,

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