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Federal

Surveys about legal problems and needs are undertaken in countries around the world. In 2021, the Canadian Legal Problems Survey (CLPS) was conducted to identify the kinds of serious legal problems people face, how they attempted to resolve them, and how these experiences have impacted their lives. This survey was conducted by Statistics Canada on behalf of the Department of Justice Canada and other federal departments. The CLPS is the latest legal needs survey conducted in Canada.

Last Updated: Sep. 22, 2022
Date Published: Dec. 15, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Legal needs survey, survey, Justice system, Research, Qualitative studies
Federal

Under the new judicial application process introduced by the Minister of Justice on October 20, 2016, any interested and qualified Canadian lawyer or judge may apply for federal judicial appointment by completing a questionnaire. The questionnaires are then used by the Judicial Advisory Committees across Canada to review candidates and submit a list of “highly recommended” and “recommended” candidates for consideration by the Minister of Justice. Candidates are advised that parts of their questionnaire may be made available to the public, with their consent, should they be appointed to the bench. The information is published as it was submitted by the candidates at the time they applied, subject to editing where necessary for privacy reasons.

Last Updated: Feb. 4, 2019
Date Published: Nov. 22, 2018
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Justice System, Questionnaire, Judicial Appointment, Judges, Backgrounders
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Sep. 13, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 23, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  44th Parliament: 1st Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System, Self-Government Act
Federal

This paper provides an overview of the Supreme Court of Canada's findings in its December 20, 2013 Bedford decisions and explains the basis for the Government's legislative response: Bill C-36, the Protection of Communities and Exploited Persons Act, which received Royal Assent on November 6, 2014 (S.C. 2014, c.25).

In Bedford, the Supreme Court of Canada declared unconstitutional three Criminal Code offences addressing prostitution-related conduct on the basis that they violated section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms (the “Charter”). Section 7 protects the rights to life, liberty and security of the person and the right not to be deprived thereof except in accordance with the principles of fundamental justice.

Last Updated: Feb. 22, 2022
Date Published: Sep. 19, 2014
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Criminal law, Prostitution Law Reform, Justice Canada Publications, Laws and Regulations, Charter of Rights and Freedoms
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Dec. 16, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 13, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Coronavirus, Covid-19, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Justice Canada Publications, 44th Parliament: 1st Session
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Dec. 7, 2021
Date Published: Sep. 1, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Coronavirus, Covid-19, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Justice Canada Publications, 43rd Parliament: 2nd Session
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Dec. 16, 2021
Date Published: Dec. 8, 2021
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Department of Justice, Access to Information, Canada's System of Justice, Justice Canada, 44th Parliament: 1st Session, Publications, Conversion therapy
Federal

The Directory of Restorative Justice is an alphabetical listing by Province/Territory of restorative justice programs across Canada. It provides program locations, contact information and a brief description of their services.

Last Updated: Feb. 11, 2020
Date Published: Oct. 23, 2017
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: other
Keywords:  Restorative justice, Justice systems, Victims, Research
Federal

Section 4.2 of the Department of Justice Act requires the Minister of Justice to prepare a Charter Statement for every government bill to help inform public and Parliamentary debate on government bills. One of the Minister of Justice’s most important responsibilities is to examine legislation for inconsistency with the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms [“the Charter”]. By tabling a Charter Statement, the Minister is sharing some of the key considerations that informed the review of a bill for inconsistency with the Charter. A Statement identifies Charter rights and freedoms that may potentially be engaged by a bill and provides a brief explanation of the nature of any engagement, in light of the measures being proposed.

Last Updated: Mar. 31, 2022
Date Published: Mar. 24, 2022
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: HTML
Keywords:  44th Parliament: 1st Session, Charter Statement, Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, Legislation, Justice System
Federal

In recent academic, professional and media conversations regarding pre-trial detention in Canada, a new expression has been taking shape. Specifically, an increasing number of people have claimed that “Bail is Broken” in this country. It is likely safe to assume that the generic reference to ‘bail’ in this context refers not only to the bail process (i.e. the criminal procedure of determining whether an accused detained by the police will be released or formally detained until trial) but also to remand (i.e.

Last Updated: Sep. 27, 2022
Date Published: Jun. 1, 2015
Organization: Department of Justice Canada
Formats: PDF HTML
Keywords:  access to justice, Indigenous justice, restorative justice, Victims
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